Dr Mary Iliadis

Dr Mary Iliadis is a Lecturer in Criminology in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at Deakin University.

Mary’s research adopts a socio-legal framework to examine, critique and impact legal policy concerning victims’ rights, with a particular focus on the rights afforded to victims of sexual violence. Mary’s research is international in its scope and explores the rights and protections afforded to victims across England and Wales, Ireland and Australia. More broadly, Mary researches prosecutorial discretion and explores how access to justice is negotiated for victims in criminal trials.

Mary has published in leading criminology and law journals, including in the British Journal of Criminology and Monash University Law Review. Mary has secured a book contract with Routledge Publishers. Her book, Adversarial Justice and Victims’ Rights: Reconceptualising the Role of Sexual Assault Victims, will feature in Professor Sandra Walklate’s and Professor Kerry Carrington’s Victims, Culture and Society series in December 2019. 

Mary also conducts research in the areas of public criminology, newsmaking criminology and digital criminology. She is currently co-authoring a research project entitled, Public Criminology in the Post-Broadcast Era, with Dr Mark Wood (University of Melbourne) and Dr Imogen Richards (Deakin University). This research project is the first to present a quantitative and qualitative analysis of criminologists’ perceptions and practices in relation to newsmaking and public criminology in an era of post-broadcast engagement. It accounts for criminologists’ perceptions of the benefits of public criminological scholarship, as well as perceived political, ethical and logistical limitations across Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the US, the UK, Africa and Ireland. 

Mary’s research has gained traction in government circles and her findings were cited in the VLRC’s (2016) report on The Role of Victims of Crime in the Criminal Trial, demonstrating a high-level of impact. Mary was also consulted by the South Australian Law Reform Institute and advised on some of the criticisms of the law in relation to the partial defence of provocation, see David Plater, David Bleby (QC), Lucy Line, Megan Lawson,  Amy Teakle, Katherine O’Connell and Kaet Fitz-Gibbon, The Provoking Operation of Provocation: Stage 2, South Australian Law Reform Institute, Adelaide, 2018.

Mary has received outstanding recognition for her teaching achievements. In Trimester 1, 2018, Mary received a letter of commendation from Deakin University’s Head of School for her high teaching evaluations in Crime, Victims and Justice. In Trimester 2 in Crime, Media and Justice, 98% of students ‘strongly agreed/agreed’ that they were satisfied with the quality of Mary’s teaching. In 2017, Mary was awarded with a Faculty of Arts Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning with colleague, Dr Asher Flynn, for their innovative and sustained contributions to teaching and supporting students in Criminology, and for fostering a sense of ownership, independence and engagement in student learning at Monash University. In 2016, Mary received a letter of commendation from Monash University’s Vice Provost (Learning and Teaching) for achieving a high unit evaluation result for Victims, Justice and the Law, which placed her unit in the top 8.91% of subjects offered at Monash University in Semester 1, 2016. 

Current research projects:

  • Book: Adversarial Justice and Victims’ Rights: Reconceptualising the Role of Sexual Assault Victims. This book contract is with Routledge Publishers and will feature in Professor Sandra Walklate’s and Professor Kerry Carrington’s Victims, Culture and Society series in December 2019. 
  • Ongoing collaboration: Public Criminology in the Post-Broadcast Era: International Comparative Perspectives and Experience, with Dr Mark Wood (University of Melbourne) and Dr Imogen Richards (Deakin University).
  • Independent legal representation for rape victims? A case study of Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland and inquisitorial models of reform, with Dr Olivia Smith (Anglia Ruskin University)

Research expertise:

  • Victims’ Rights
  • Rape and sexual violence 
  • Gendered violence
  • Access to justice
  • Law reform
  • Prosecutorial discretion
  • Criminal trials
  • Public criminology
  • Newsmaking criminology

Publications:

  • Wood, A., Richards, R., Iliadis, M. & McDermott, M. (2019 forthcoming). ‘Digital Public Criminology in Australia and New Zealand’, International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy.
  • Kirchengast, K., Iliadis, M. & O’Connell, M. (2019 forthcoming). ‘Enforcing Charter Rights through the Office of Commissioner of Victims’ Rights: Integrity, Access and Justice for Victims of Crime, Monash University Law Review.
  • Iliadis, M. & Flynn, A. (2018). ‘Providing a Check on Prosecutorial Decision-Making: An Analysis of the Victims’ Right to Review Reform’, British Journal of Criminology, 58(3), 550–568.

Government submissions:

  • Iliadis, M. (2015). Submission 8, Victorian Law Reform Commission on The Role of Victims of Crime in the Criminal Trial Process.

Presentations:

  • Increasing the Role of Third Parties: Legal Representation for Sexual History Evidence in Ireland, Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology, University of Melbourne, 4–7 December 2018.
  • ‘Cinderellas Ultimately become Princesses’? Modern Prosecutorial Accountability to Victims and the Roles of Victim Review Schemes and Judicial Review’, Law and Society Association of Australia and New Zealand, University of Wollongong, 12–15 December 2018.
  • Victim Representation for Sexual History Evidence in Ireland: A Step Towards or Away from Meeting Victims’’ Procedural Justice Needs? Law and Society Association of Australia and New Zealand, University of Wollongong, 12–15 December 2018.
  • Increasing the Role of Third Parties: Legal Representation for Sexual History Evidence in Ireland, British Society of Criminology Conference, Birmingham, United Kingdom, 6–8 July 2018.
  • Providing a Check on Prosecutorial Discretion – An Analysis of the VRR Reform, ANZSOC, Canberra, 6–8 December 2017.
  • Legal Representation for Third Party Sexual History Evidence, Victorian Post-graduate Criminology Conference 2016, Melbourne, 21 June 2016.
  • Allowing Victims the Right to Review Prosecutorial Decisions: A Step Towards or Away from Meeting Victims’ Justice Needs? Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology Conference 2015, Adelaide, 24–27 November 2015.
  • Sexual Assault Victims’ Rights within Victoria: Possibilities for Reform? British Society of Criminology Conference, Plymouth, United Kingdom, 1–3 July 2015.
  • Assessing the Rights of Sexual Assault Victims within the Adversarial Framework: The Viability of Victim Representation in Victoria, Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology Postgraduate and Early Career Researcher Conference, University of Sydney, NSW, 30 September 2014.
  • Victimisation Theories and the Modern-day ‘Ideal’ Victim, Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference, Flinders University, Adelaide, 22–23 July 2013.
  • Victimisation Theories and the Modern-day ‘Ideal’ Victim, Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology Postgraduate and Early Career Research Conference, Griffith University, Queensland, 30 September 2013.