Ideal landscapes, planning and heritage in postwar British culture

Please join us for our next seminar on Wednesday 31 July, when Dr Lauren Piko will speak on British post war planning.  Lauren writes: 

‘While Britain’s postwar planned landscapes, including modernist urban redevelopments and new towns, have received increasing attention from historians and heritage professions over recent decades, in political rhetoric and popular culture these landscapes have consistently been viewed as unable to accumulate and retain meaning, and as therefore as dystopian, unnatural, and even foreign. This is particularly the case for the new town of Milton Keynes, the experimental new town designated in 1967; even as residents celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2017, the town has been consistently represented sterile, dystopian, and even as a threat to ideals of national heritage and tradition itself. This presentation draws on the recent book Milton Keynes in British Culture: Imagining England, along with wider case studies, to examine the cultural histories of attitudes to ideal landscapes in Britain, and their wider political functions in debates around tradition, national identity, and the contested legacy of the reconstructionist state’.

Concrete Cows in Milton Keynes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Lauren Pikó is a 2019 Gilbert Early Career Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies at the University of Melbourne. Her research focuses on cultural and intellectual histories of ideal landscape forms in Britain and Australia. Her book Milton Keynes in British Culture: Imagining England was published by Routledge in 2019.

Date: Wednesday 31 July, 2019

Time: 5pm – 6pm

Venue: Deakin Downtown, 727 Collins St, Tower 2, Level 12

Free of charge, all welcome.

 

For further information: contact Beatrice Harris harrisbe@deakin.edu.au

Venue Tip: Deakin’s new city centre campus is a short walk from Southern Cross Station towards Docklands and on part of the free city centre tram network (Stop D15 on routes 11 and 48).  Entry is via Tower Two.  The reception desk directs you to an escalator to a bank of lifts and Deakin Downtown is on Level 12.

Conceiving Resolutions on Heritage and its Management

Professor K. Krishnan

Up next is a seminar from Professor Krishnan from the department of Archaeology and Ancient History at the Maharajo Sayajirao University of Baroda in India.

In the seminar, Professor Krishnan will discuss how heritage impacts the formulation of identities in South Asian society. The varied dimensions of heritage can be classified as tangible and intangible, and they serve as carriers of the past and memories of contemporary communities.

 

Often it is the case that the functionality of a heritage place evolves over time in accordance with the intangible elements associated with it. Such complex interactions often threaten the conservation  of tangible heritage. However, an undue stress on the conservation of tangible heritage without taking into account contemporary intangible accounts may result in social conflicts. Due to this conflict, heritage site managers frequently encounter conflicting viewpoints that can generate social unrest. Using examples from his experiences in South Asia, Professor Krishnan’s presentation aims at examining how heritage can be conserved without depriving the stake holders access to the heritage entities.

 

Free of Charge – all welcome

Date: Wednesday 13 March 2019

Time: 4pm – 5pm (please note earlier time)

Venue: Deakin Downtown, 727 Collins St, Tower 2, Level 12

Venue Tip: Deakin’s city centre campus is a short walk from Southern Cross Station towards Docklands, and is at Stop D15 of the free city centre tram network (routes 11 and 48).  Entry is via Tower Two.  The reception desk directs you to an escalator to a bank of lifts and ‘Deakin Downtown’ is on Level 12.

www.deakin.edu.au/locations/deakin-corporate-centres/deakin-downtown

For further enquiries:
Steven Cooke: steven.cooke@deakin.edu.au

‘Daily detritus’ as Cultural Heritage

Our next Cultural Heritage seminar will be given by Dr Sarah Hayes from Deakin University. 

Historical archaeology in Australia is primarily driven by cultural heritage management in response to heritage legislation. The result: vast collections of broken ceramics, bottle glass and other daily detritus from long ago carefully conserved and housed in corflute boxes in repositories, museums and archaeologists’ sheds. They are preserved for posterity and these ever growing collections will be housed in perpetuity. This seminar will explore the limitations and potentials of such collections as a heritage resource (in contrast to a research resource). Drawing on the Sarah’s current research into quality of life in the Gold Rush era, it will argue for the role of storytelling through site tours, museum displays and beyond in enhancing the heritage value of the collections. And there will be stories. Stories of everyday Victorians and the material trajectories of their lives in a time of great upheaval.

Read more of Sarah’s work at www.deakin.edu.au/about-deakin/people/sarah-hayes

Free of Charge – all welcome

Date: Thursday 30 August 2018

Time: 5.00pm – 6 pm

Venue: Deakin Downtown, 727 Collins St, Tower 2, Level 12

Venue Tip: Deakin’s city centre campus is between Southern Cross Station and Docklands, on tram routes 11 and 48 (Stop D15).  Entry is via Tower Two.  The reception desk directs you to an escalator to a bank of lifts and ‘Deakin Downtown’ is on Level 12.

www.deakin.edu.au/locations/deakin-corporate-centres/deakin-downtown

For further enquiries:

Steven Cooke: steven.cooke@deakin.edu.au