Newsletter stream

Friday 16th October 2020. 

Publications. 

In the Conversation, Associate Professor Clare Corbould and Dr. Zim Nwokora tackled the long history and likely ways racist voter suppression and activation will play out in this year’s US presidential election. 

Professor Peter Edwards’ book Law, Politics and Intelligence: A Life of Robert Hope was published by NewSouth Publishing in March. The book was launched by the Governor of New South Wales, H.E. the Hon. Margaret Beazley AC QC, in the Supreme Court of NSW on 6 March. Planned launches in Canberra and Melbourne were postponed because of the COVID pandemic. 

Peter’s book received a number of positive reviews, including Justin Burke’s review which appeared in Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter-Terrorism, 8 June 2020 and Alison Broinowski’s review which appeared in Honest History, 12 June 2020. 

 

Australian Policy and History Update.

In APH’s recent author Q&A, Dr. Carolyn Holbrook interviewed the acclaimed biographer, journalist and broadcaster Jacqueline Kent about her latest work, ‘Vida: A Woman For Our Time’.

 

Friday 9th October 2020. 

Announcements. 

Congratulations to Professor David Lowe, who has recently been appointed the Deputy Chair of the History Council of Victoria.

Publications. 

Dr Jason Gibson has signed a contract with Routledge (UK) for his next book Repatriation of Indigenous Cultural Heritage: Australian Experiences. The book will appear in the ‘Museums in Focus Series’ and is scheduled for publication at the end of 2021. 

Associate Professor Cassandra Atherton and Professor Paul Hetherington have written the definitive book on prose poetry, titled Prose poetry: An introduction

Events. 

15th-18th October: Associate Professor Clare Corbould is co-organising a symposium on “The Global Plantation” with Anna Arabindan-Kesson (Princeton University) and Jarvis McInnis (Duke University).  In six zoom sessions over three days, scholars and artists will investigate the plantation’s iterations across temporal and spatial geographies.  The keynote speaker is anthropologist Deborah Thomas (Penn).  All welcome.  Registration is free

Australian Policy and History. 

In APH’s recent opinion piece, Nicholas Ferns describes the decline of Australian aid to our region. Reviewing decades of developmental policy to the Pacific and south-east Asia, he argues that the challenges presented by COVID and increased Chinese activity suggest Australia should redouble its humanitarian efforts. 

Funding Opportunities. 

Patrick-Jean Guay has identified funding opportunities that could be of interest to CHRG members. Patrick has requested to be notified (via the Faculty Research mailbox artsed-research-grants@deakin.edu.au) and via the completion of the Faculty on-line NOIS form (https://deakinuniversity-vcjls.formstack.com/forms/nois) if anyone is interested in applying to any of those opportunities. If you need any further assistance, please contact Patrick (patrick.guay@deakin.edu.au ) 

COMING SOON: Vida Lahey memorial travelling scholarship  
    Queensland Art Gallery
 
    *** This opportunity will be available soon. The next call is expected to open towards the end of 2020. The following information is subject to change. This scholarship enables an emerging Australian artist or history of art graduate to develop their practice or research through national or overseas travel. One scholarship worth AUD 40,000 is available. ***  
    Closing date: 07 Dec 20  (Forecast). 
You can find more information here.    
 
    Long-term research grants  
   
Henry Moore Foundation
 
    These support extended, sculpture-focused research projects requiring funding for more than one year, such as a permanent collection catalogue. Grants are worth up to £20,000 each. 
Closing date: 09 Dec 20 . 
You can find more information here.    
 
    Short term grants for Armenian studies  
    Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation  
    These enable researchers in Armenian studies to participate in activities related to their field of studies, encouraging academic interaction and exchange of knowledge and ideas. Grants are worth up to €5,000 each. 
 Closing date: 11 Dec 20   
You can find more information here.  

 
    Raffaele Pettazzoni postdoctoral research grant in the history of religion  
    Lincean Academy | Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei  
    This supports a postdoctoral researcher in conducting research on any aspect of the history of religion, either in Italy or abroad. The scholarship is worth €22,947 for one year. All information is in Italian.  
    Closing date: 11 Dec 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here.  

 

Friday 2nd October 2020. 

Publications. 

Dr. Kerri Anne Garrard’s article titled ‘Finding a way in for interculturality: Analysing history teachers’ conceptualisations at the secondary school level’ has been published in Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education. You can read it in full here

Professor David Lowe reflected on how future historians will write about 2020 and the impacts that historians can have on current policy-making in an interview with this.

Events. 

The History Council of Victoria’s annual lecture will take place on Thursday 8th October. Titled Futures Past and Possible: Histories of and for Tomorrow, this lecture will be presented by environmental historian and historian of science Ruth Morgan. You can find more information about the lecture and registration details here.

 

The 2020 program for the Word For Word Festival has launched. Professor David McCooey will chair an event titled Hidden Illness. Speakers on this panel include Jacinta Parsons, Karen Hitchcock and Astrid Edwards. 

Public Lectures. 

Professor Klaus Neumann has given a public lecture at the StadtMuseum Pirna, Germany. Titled, ‘Flucht und Vertreibung in historischer Perspektive’, you can find the transcript of the lecture here

Database Trial. 

The Deakin Library is currently running a trial of the Gale Archives of Gender and Sexuality.

You can access the databases until Tuesday 20 October:

If you have any feedback about the value of the content and/or the ease of use of the database, please send it to Brad Adams: b.adams@deakin.edu.au 

Australian Policy and History Update. 

In APH’s recent author Q&A, Jimmy Yan interviewed Terry Irvine about his recent biography, The fatal lure of politics: The life and thought of Vere Gordon Childe.

CHRG Seminar Series. 

The CHRG trimester two seminar series has now come to an end. Thank you to all those who were able to attend, and a big thank you to all of our trimester two presenters: Filip Slaveski, Henry Reese, Andrea Witcomb, Gwyn McClelland, Hirokazu Matsui, Gabrielle Wolf, Tony Joel, Niro Kandasamy, Mia Martin Hobbs and Greg Burgess. 

We look forward to recommencing the seminar series in 2021!

Funding Opportunities. 

Patrick-Jean Guay has identified funding opportunities that could be of interest to CHRG members. Patrick has requested to be notified (via the Faculty Research mailbox artsed-research-grants@deakin.edu.au) and via the completion of the Faculty on-line NOIS form (https://deakinuniversity-vcjls.formstack.com/forms/nois) if anyone is interested in applying to any of those opportunities. If you need any further assistance, please contact Patrick (patrick.guay@deakin.edu.au ) 

Canadian studies postdoctoral fellowships  
    International Council for Canadian Studies | Conseil International d’Études Canadiennes  
    These enable visits to a Canadian or foreign university with a Canadian studies programme for a teaching or research fellowship. The grant is worth CAD 2,500 per month over one to three months, plus the cost of a return airline ticket.  
    Closing date: 24 Nov 20   
You can find more information here.

 
    Publishing fund  
    International Council for Canadian Studies | Conseil International d’Études Canadiennes  
    This supports the publication and distribution in Canada of scholarly monographs on Canada.  
    Closing date: 24 Nov 20   
You can find more information here

 
   
Research project grants
 
    Gerda Henkel Foundation | Gerda Henkel Stiftung  
    These support research projects in the historical humanities, particularly within the fields of archaeology, history of art, historical Islamic studies, history, history of law, history of science, prehistory and early history. Grants are worth up to €25,000 each. 
 Closing date: 24 Nov 20   
You can find more information here


 
    Research scholarships  
    Gerda Henkel Foundation | Gerda Henkel Stiftung  
    These enable scholars to undertake a research project within the historical humanities, particularly within the fields of archaeology, history of art, historical Islamic studies, history, history of law, history of science, prehistory and early history. Scholarships are worth up to €3,100 per month over up two years.  
    Closing date: 24 Nov 20   
You can find more information here

 
  Special programme on security, society and the state  
    Gerda Henkel Foundation | Gerda Henkel Stiftung  
    This supports research addressing new security-related issues that are prime examples of the post-Cold-War era. Grants are worth up to €3,100 per month.  
    Closing date: 30 Nov 20   
You can find more information here.


 
    Sir George MacDonald grant  
    Society of Antiquaries of Scotland  
    This supports research that might throw light upon the Roman occupation of Scotland.   
    Closing date: 30 Nov 20   
You can find more information here. 


 
    Conference awards  
    Handel Institute  
    These support individuals who wish to attend an overseas conference in order to read a paper on a Handel-related subject that has already been accepted by the conference organisers. Awards may be used towards travel and accommodation costs. 
 Closing date: 30 Nov 20   
You can find more information here.


 
    A Verville fellowship  
    Smithsonian Institution  
    This supports the analysis of major trends, developments and accomplishments in the history of aviation or space studies. The fellowship includes an annual stipend of USD 55,000 and additional funds for travel and miscellaneous expenses.  
    Closing date: 01 Dec 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

 
    Charles A Lindbergh chair in aerospace history  
    Smithsonian Institution  
    This supports senior scholars with distinguished records of publication who are currently working on, or anticipate working on, books on aerospace history. The fellowship is worth up to USD 100,000 for one academic year.  
    Closing date: 01 Dec 20   
You can find more information here

 
    Fellowship programme   
    William Morris Society  
    This supports scholarly and creative work about William Morris. Fellowships are each worth at least USD 1,000.  
    Closing date: 01 Dec 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here


 
    Sustainable solid waste management grants  
    Environmental Research and Education Foundation  
    These support research that increases sustainable solid waste management practices. Grants are typically in the range of USD 15,000 to USD 500,000 each, with an average amount of USD 160,000, for two years.  
    Closing date: 01 Dec 20   
You can find more information here

 
 
    Curran fellowships  
    Research Society for Victorian Periodicals  
    These support research and travel for the use of primary sources for the exploration of any aspects of the British periodical press in any of its manifold forms between 1780 and 1914. At least six fellowships, worth up to USD 5,000 each, are available.  
    Closing date: 01 Dec 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here


 
    Joseph Wresinski Foundation grants for overcoming poverty  
    Institut de France  
    These support projects relating to Joseph Wresinski, the reduction of poverty and actors contributing to this goal. Grants are worth between €1,000 and €30,000 each. All information is in French.  
    Closing date: 01 Dec 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

 
 
    Italian academy fellowship programme  
    Columbia University  
    This enables postdoctoral and faculty researchers to conduct research at the Italian Academy. Approximately twenty fellowships are available, each worth up to USD 7,000 per month over up to two academic semesters.  
    Closing date: 02 Dec 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

 
    Japanese studies fellowship programme  
    Japan Foundation  
    This supports research in the humanities and social sciences relating to Japan. Fellowships include round-trip air travel to Japan, a stipend and other allowances.  
    Closing date: 02 Dec 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here


 
    Ishibashi Foundation/Japan Foundation fellowship for research on Japanese art  
    Japan Foundation  
    This supports a short research trip to Japan for a professional specialising in the study of Japanese art, with the overall goal of promoting the study of the field. The fellowship lasts for between 21 and 59 days, and includes round-trip airfare, a stipend and other allowances.  
    Closing date: 02 Dec 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

 
 
    Postdoctoral fellowships  
    University of Alberta  
    These enable individuals to conduct research at the University of Alberta. Fellowships are worth up to CAD 50,000 each per year for two years and also include a one-time grant worth CAD 4,000 for travel and research.  
    Closing date: 02 Dec 20   
You can find more information here


 
    Hurst summer institute in legal history fellowships  
    University of Wisconsin  
    These enable scholars to attend presentations, participate in discussions of core readings in legal history, and analyse the work of other participants. Travel, accommodation and meal costs are covered for a two-week period.  
    Closing date: 03 Dec 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

 
 
    British Academy/Leverhulme special funds  
    British Academy  
    These support primary research in the humanities and social sciences in specific areas of research. Grants, worth between £500 and £10,000, are tenable for between one month and two years.   
    Closing date: 03 Dec 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

 

Friday 25th September 2020. 

Achievements. 

Congratulations to Dr. Tiffany Shellam, who has been awarded a commendation in the Australian Society of Archivists Mander Jones Award for her book Meeting the Waylo: Aboriginal encounters in the Archipelago (UWAP 2019).

Congratulations to Dr. Kristine Moruzi, who has been recognised as the field leader in Literature & Writing in The Australian‘s Top 250 Researchers Report

Publications. 

Professor Klaus Neumann‘s journal article titled ‘The appeal of civil disobedience in the Central Mediterranean: German responses to the June 2019 mission of the Sea-Watch 3’, has been published in the Journal of Humanitarian Affairs, vol. 2, no. 1: 53-61. You can find the article here

In The Media. 

Honorary Fellow Roy Hay was interviewed by Claudia Craig on 3CR’s Monday Breakfast program about his book, Albert ‘Pompey’ Austin: A man between two worlds. You can listen back to the interview here (interview starts at 24:26).

Australian Policy and History Update. 

In APH’s latest author Q&A, Clive Moore talks to Bethany Keats about his recent book, Tulagi, which focuses on the British Solomon Islands Protectorate (BSIP) and its original administrative centre.

You can now follow APH on LinkedIn. Stay up-to-date here

Seminar Series. 

Zoom invitations for Greg Burgess’ seminar have been emailed. If you didn’t receive an invitation (or if you would like to be re-sent the zoom invitation), please contact Jacqui (bakerjacq@deakin.edu.au). We look forward to seeing you there!

30th September: Greg Burgess, Senior Fellow, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne. 

Title: Completing the Work of 1789. France 1946, the Social and Economic Rights of Man, and Post-War Rights Ideas before the 1948 Universal Declaration.

Georges Gurvitch

Abstract: ‘It is at the grave hours of their history that a people rethink their institutions and the principles on which their societies are based.’ So stated the rapporteur of the Constitutional Commission of the French Provisional Government when he introduced a new Declaration of Rights in March 1946. The deputies of the Provisional Government were very conscious of their role in completing the historical task of updating and completing the original declaration of rights of 1789. They set about declaring social and economic rights, which alone would ensure true equality and therefore true liberty. I want to look behind this moment with a review of the period from the 1930s to the late 1940s, when, the sociologist Georges Gurvitch wrote when presenting his own bill of rights in 1944, declarations were the order of the day. We must suspend our assumptions of international human rights that are fixed on the 1948 United Nations Declaration and remember the purpose of rights – to assure freedom and equality certainly, but through them national governments would make a pledge to respect the dignity of their peoples through social and economic rights to complement civil and political rights. My focus is on France, but these ideals can be seen in wider contexts.

 

Friday 18th September 2020. 

Member Welcome. 

CHRG would like to extend a warm welcome to Dr. Victoria Duckett!

Victoria Duckett is a media historian and film curator who is Senior Lecturer in Screen at Deakin University. She is author of the award winning book, Seeing Sarah Bernhardt: Performance and Silent Film, and co-editor of the collection Researching Women in Silent Cinema: New Findings and Perspectives. She is currently completing a book that explores French stage actresses and the development of transnational film industries (Media matriarchs: French stage celebrity and the development of transnational film, University of California Press). Chief investigator of the project Guglielmo Giannini: A digital archive of theatre, film, entertainment and political activism, she is co-hosting (with the University of Milan) a conference in November entitled Guglielmo Giannini: Entertainment and Political Activism. With Richard Abel (U. Michigan) Victoria is curating a series of programs for the silent film festival, Le Giornate del Cinema Muto (Pordenone) featuring the music hall performer Mistinguett and the comic actress, Réjane. Victoria is also developing a project entitled Building a popular memory bank in Australia: the people of Hong Kong at the end of the British Empire. This builds a popular memory bank of the English-speaking colonial history of Hong Kong,  recording colonial Hong Kong residents in order to develop a case study of the end of British Empire. 

Australian Policy and History Update. 

Russell McGregor chatted with Lyndon Megarrity about his recent publication, Idling in green places: A life of Alec Chisholm, which was shortlisted for the National Biography Award.

Seminar Series. 

Zoom invitations for Niro Kandasamy and Mia Martin’s Hobbs’ seminar have been emailed. If you didn’t receive an invitation (or if you would like to be re-sent the zoom invitation), please contact Jacqui (bakerjacq@deakin.edu.au). We look forward to seeing you there!

23rd September: Niro Kandasamy and Mia Martin Hobbs. 

Mia Martin Hobbs. 

Title: Codes, Nodes, and Memos: Using NVivo to Map Themes and Analyse Dynamics in Oral Histories of the US Military Reconstruction of Iraq.

Abstract: Despite the widespread use of computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software in social science research, many historians primarily analyse their historical sources manually, or combine multiple digital technologies for different stages of analysis. Software such as NVivo supports most stages and aspects of historical research, including data storage, examination, organization, analysis, and interpretation. Rather than “doing the work for you”, NVivo facilitates deep qualitative analysis, encouraging review and refinement of concepts, themes, and connections.  

Drawing on research conducted with the United States Institute for Peace Oral History “Iraq Experience” Project, I will demonstrate how I use NVivo for mapping (“coding”) concepts and themes (“nodes”), reflecting on and interpreting dynamics (“memos”), and visualizing data in oral history research. I find NVivo useful for thinking through relationships between themes and concepts – such as interviewee observations on the impact of regime legacies on the occupied population – and attributes and meta-data – such as the interviewee’s gender identity, or the time of the interview – in historical research. I will also demonstrate how to use coding to create timelines in NVivo, allowing users to analyse change over time in qualitative data. 

Niro Kandasamy. 

Title: A middle power in the Indian Ocean? Australia’s foreign relations with Sri Lanka, 1972-1989.

Abstract: Australia’s foreign policy in the 1970s and 1980s is generally characterised by its role and status as a ‘middle power’ – striking a balance between its ‘rights’ and ‘responsibilities’. During this period, the much tighter integration of the international community and the gradual recognition of interdependency advocated by Australia involved a key site: the Indian Ocean. Australia’s first white paper in 1976 placed the Indian Ocean as a potential site for an international crisis, mainly due to the military presence of the USSR and the US, with the former viewed as a threat to critical lines of oil supply, food, and other resources to Australia. For these reasons, Australia adopted an outward restraint against the Indian Ocean activities of both the US and USSR, showing support for key measures such as the Indian Ocean Zone of Peace that was initiated by Sri Lanka at the United Nations in 1971. Drawing on archival materials, this paper examines Australia’s foreign relations with Sri Lanka in the 1970s and 1980s in relation to the Indian Ocean. By considering the Indian Ocean as a key site for political and cultural-historical development, the paper aims to ‘think through oceans’ and complicates Australia’s status as being less a middle power than a ‘functional power’.  

 

30th September: Greg Burgess, Senior Fellow, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne. 

Title: Completing the Work of 1789. France 1946, the Social and Economic Rights of Man, and Post-War Rights Ideas before the 1948 Universal Declaration.

Georges Gurvitch

Abstract: ‘It is at the grave hours of their history that a people rethink their institutions and the principles on which their societies are based.’ So stated the rapporteur of the Constitutional Commission of the French Provisional Government when he introduced a new Declaration of Rights in March 1946. The deputies of the Provisional Government were very conscious of their role in completing the historical task of updating and completing the original declaration of rights of 1789. They set about declaring social and economic rights, which alone would ensure true equality and therefore true liberty. I want to look behind this moment with a review of the period from the 1930s to the late 1940s, when, the sociologist Georges Gurvitch wrote when presenting his own bill of rights in 1944, declarations were the order of the day. We must suspend our assumptions of international human rights that are fixed on the 1948 United Nations Declaration and remember the purpose of rights – to assure freedom and equality certainly, but through them national governments would make a pledge to respect the dignity of their peoples through social and economic rights to complement civil and political rights. My focus is on France, but these ideals can be seen in wider contexts.

 

Funding Opportunities

Patrick-Jean Guay has identified funding opportunities that could be of interest to CHRG members. Patrick has requested to be notified (via the Faculty Research mailbox artsed-research-grants@deakin.edu.au) and via the completion of the Faculty on-line NOIS form (https://deakinuniversity-vcjls.formstack.com/forms/nois) if anyone is interested in applying to any of those opportunities. If you need any further assistance, please contact Patrick (patrick.guay@deakin.edu.au ) 

Senior scholarly and professional development fellowships  
    American Institute of Indian Studies  
    These support established scholars who have not previously specialised in Indian studies and established professionals who have not previously worked or studied in India. Fellowships are worth INR 140,000 per month for between six and nine months in addition to travel.  
    Closing date: 15 Nov 20.
You can find more information here
 
    Grants for conservation and interpretation  
    Copland Foundation  
    These fund projects involved in the conservation, research or interpretation of historic houses or gardens, or collections and individual pieces held by an institution. Grants are worth a maximum of AUD 50,000.  
    Closing date: 15 Nov 20   
You can find more information here

  
 
    Villa I Tatti – Boğaziçi University joint fellowship  
    Harvard University  
    This supports early-career scholars whose work explores Byzantium’s cross-cultural contacts with Italy in the late medieval and early modern Mediterranean world. The fellowship is worth up to USD 40,200 over 10 months.  
    Closing date: 15 Nov 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

 
    Other project grants  
    Atlas Network  
    These support projects that promote liberty and that do not match any of the other grant opportunities offered by Atlas Network.  
    Closing date: 15 Nov 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

 
    Visiting fellowships  
    Toulouse Institute for Advanced Study  
    These enable researchers to visit the institute and offer the chance to explore new territory in a cross-disciplinary direction. Fellowships include reimbursement of travel and living expenses and candidates are provided with a shared office.   
    Closing date: 15 Nov 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

  
 
    Affiliated fellowship in Rome  
    Terra Foundation for American Art  
    This supports a postdoctoral or senior scholar in conducting research on American art and visual culture prior to 1980 while in residence at the American Academy in Rome. The fellowship includes accommodation, meals, a private study and a stipend of USD 2,500 per month for a period of four to six months.  
    Closing date: 15 Nov 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

 
    Joining up to minimise poverty grants  
    Atlas Network  
    These support projects that aim to spread awareness to new audiences of how poverty can be reduced by increasing economic freedom. Grants are worth up to USD 15,000 each.  
    Closing date: 15 Nov 20
You can find more information here.  


 
    COMING SOON: Special major research grants – development finance  
    Centre for Economic Policy Research  
    *** This opportunity will be available soon. The next call is expected to close on 15 November 2020. The following information is subject to change. These grants support research on development finance within the context of private sector development in low-income countries. ***  
    Closing date: 15 Nov 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here.


 
    COMING SOON: Regular major research grants  
    Centre for Economic Policy Research  
    *** This opportunity will be available soon. The next call is expected to close on 15 November 2020. The following information is subject to change. These grants support research related to private enterprises of all sizes that may focus on any aspect of private sector development in low-income countries. Grants are worth on average £300,000 each for between 24 and 36 months. ***  
    Closing date: 15 Nov 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

 
    Kemble fellowship in maritime history  
    Huntington Library  
    This supports research in maritime history using the Huntington Library’s collection. The fellowship is worth USD 50,000 over nine months to one year.  
    Closing date: 16 Nov 20   
You can find more information here. 

 
    Octavia E Butler fellowship  
    Huntington Library  
    This supports research on a variety of disciplinary perspectives on the ideas and issues explored by Butler in her published works, ranging from speculative fiction through Afrofuturism to environmental studies and biotechnology. The fellowship is worth USD 50,000 for nine to 12 months.  
    Closing date: 16 Nov 20   
You can find more information here

 
    Towards a national collection – discovery projects  
    Arts and Humanities Research Council  
    This supports projects addressing the lack of coordination between different online collections and catalogues in the UK cultural and heritage sector. Grants are worth up to £3 million at 80 per cent of the total project costs for up to three years.   
    Closing date: 17 Nov 20   
You can find more information here

 
    Partnership projects  
    National Health and Medical Research Council  
    These assist in constructing partnerships among decision makers, policy makers, managers, clinicians and researchers to work together to define research questions, undertake research, interpret the findings and implement the findings into policy and practice. Grants are worth up to AUD 1.5 million for one to five years.  
    Closing date: 18 Nov 20   
You can find more information here


 
    Soros justice advocacy fellowships  
    Open Society Foundations  
    These support US criminal justice reform research at the local, state and national levels. Fellowships are worth up to USD 127,500, over 18 months.  
    Closing date: 20 Nov 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

  
 
    Support programme for translation and publication on Japan  
    Japan Foundation  
    This provides financial support for non-Japanese publishers to translate or publish Japan-related books with the overall aim of promoting better understanding of Japanese culture and Japanese studies abroad. The average grant amount is JPY 570,000. 
Closing date: 20 Nov 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

  

 

Friday 11th September 2020. 

In The Media. 

Dr. Gywn McClelland appeared on a panel, Remembering the Atomic Bombs: History, Memory and Politics in Australia, Japan and the Pacific, which was part of the History Council of Victoria’s Making Public Histories series. A recording of the panel was played back on Radio National’s Big Ideas with Paul Barclay. You can listen back here

Book Reviews. 

Honorary Fellow Roy Hay‘s book, Albert “Pompey” Austin: A man between two worlds, has been reviewed by Braham Dabscheck for The Footy Almanac. 

Australian Policy and History. 

In APH’s latest opinion piece, Gwenda Tavan, Jayne Persian and Justine Greenwood place the rise of racist incidents directed at people from Asian backgrounds in a historical context and offer an informed and thoughtful answer to the question: what might the Department of Immigration contribute post-COVID 19?

CHRG Seminar Series. 

23rd September: Niro Kandasamy and Mia Martin Hobbs. 
Title and abstract: TBA. 

30th September: Greg Burgess. 
Title and abstract: TBA.  

 

Friday 4th September 2020. 

Publications. 

Honorary Fellow Ian Kemish authored an article for The Conversation. Titled ‘China wants to be a friend to the Pacific, but so far, it has failed to match Australia’s COVID-19 response’, Ian considers China’s interest in the Pacific and whether the country would be a constructive long term partner for the region. 

Dr. Gwyn McClelland authored a piece for The Catholic Weekly. Drawing on research from his new book, Gwyn explains that Catholic atomic bomb survivors of Nagasaki have ‘complex and culturally specific memories of its impact and aftermath’. You can read it in full here

Associate professor Clare Corbould wrote about the passing of actor Chadwick Boseman, and discussed the potential, and limits, of Afrofuturism, for The Conversation

Dr. Jason Gibson has co-authored an article with Dr. Vanessa Russ (UWA) for The Conversation titled ‘Perth already has a museum of Indigenous art and culture. With proper funding, it could be our national centre’. 

Honorary Fellow Roy Hay‘s book, Albert ‘Pompey’ Austin: A man between two worlds, has provided context to an article in The Age

In The Media. 

Dr. Gwyn McClelland was interviewed by Peter Holmes on This Catholic Life Podcast. 

Australian Policy and History. 

Academic and writer Patrick Mullins chats with Michelle Arrow about writing history and biography, Australian censorship laws, and his most recent book, ‘The trials of Portnoy’. You can read the Q&A here

CHRG Seminar Series.

Zoom invitations for Tony Joel’s seminar have been emailed. If you didn’t receive an invitation (or if you would like to be re-sent the zoom invitation), please contact Jacqui (bakerjacq@deakin.edu.au). We look forward to seeing you there!

9th September: Tony Joel. 
Title: Roving Beyond Bongo: Teaching and Researching the History of Australian Football.
Abstract: The recent publication of On the Take, which tells the story of champion rover Alex “Bongo” Lang and the Carlton bribery scandal of 1910, exemplifies how singular episodes in Australian football history unexpectedly can become major research projects. In 2021, Deakin will introduce the new unit AST250 A History of Australian Football, 1858-2020. Tasked with creating this unit, over the next six months I will be writing curriculum that covers major episodes along with key trends and developments spanning over 150 years. I am approaching this curriculum development process with a view to not only creating a new unit, but also in anticipation that it will play an instrumental role in shaping my currently undecided research agenda over the next 3-5 years. This week’s seminar will deviate from the usual format of presenting a polished research paper followed by a short Q&A session. Instead, it will be run with a more interactive approach with everyone encouraged to join in a discussion broadly based around the teaching-research nexus. I will commence by briefly describing how the “Bongo” Lang story surprisingly materialised into a book, then will outline the structure of Deakin’s forthcoming unit on the history of Australian football and some possible research topics, before inviting seminar attendees to discuss how teaching can shape our research and vice versa.

23rd September: Niro Kandasamy and Mia Martin Hobbs. 
Title and abstract: TBA. 

30th September: Greg Burgess. 
Title and abstract: TBA. 

Opportunities. 

Patrick-Jean Guay has identified funding opportunities that could be of interest to CHRG members. Patrick has requested to be notified (via the Faculty Research mailbox artsed-research-grants@deakin.edu.au) and via the completion of the Faculty on-line NOIS form (https://deakinuniversity-vcjls.formstack.com/forms/nois) if anyone is interested in applying to any of those opportunities. If you need any further assistance, please contact Patrick (patrick.guay@deakin.edu.au ) 

 Snorri Sturluson Icelandic fellowships  
    University of Iceland | Háskóli Íslands  
    These enable scholars to stay in Iceland in order to improve their knowledge of the Icelandic language, culture and society. Fellowships cover travel expenses to and from Iceland, plus living expenses for a period of at least three months.  
    Closing date: 31 Oct 20   
You can find more information here

     
    Kingdon fellowships  
    University of Wisconsin  
    These support scholars working in the humanities in the historical, literary, artistic, or philosophical studies of Christian or Jewish religious traditions and their role in society. The stipend is worth USD 57,000 over one year.  
    Closing date: 31 Oct 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here.


     
    Nurse in Washington Internship grant  
    Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses  
    This supports a member of the academy in attending the Nurse in Washington Internship event. One grant is available to cover the cost of registration and accommodation.  
    Closing date: 31 Oct 20   
You can find more information here.


     
    ICSCC visiting scholars programme  
    Fudan University  
    This supports foreign researchers in pursuing independent research while in residence at Fudan University. Grants cover travel costs, subsistence, accommodation, and access to the university’s printing failities and libraries.  
    Closing date: 31 Oct 20   
You can find more information here.


     
    Guido Cazzavillan research grant  
    Cà Foscari University of Venice | Università Cà Foscari degli Studi di Venezia  
    This supports research in economics to reduce inequality and poverty, with a focus on developing countries. The grant is worth €52,000 for one year. All information is in Italian.  
    Closing date: 31 Oct 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

     
    Andrew W Mellon foundation fellowship  
    Newberry Library  
    This supports postdoctoral scholars in any field relevant to the library’s collections. The fellowship includes a stipend worth USD 4,200 per month for four to nine months.  
    Closing date: 01 Nov 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

   
     
    Archaeology of Portugal fellowship  
    Archaeological Institute of America  
    This supports projects pertaining to the archaeology of Portugal. Grants are worth between USD 2,000 and USD 7,500.  
    Closing date: 01 Nov 20   
You can find more information here

     
    Australia-China joint action programme  
    Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia  
    This provides Australian and Chinese Academy of Social Sciences scholars with the opportunity to begin new collaborations. Grants are each worth AUD 7,000 for the Australian component of the project, and CNY 25,000 for the Chinese component.  
    Closing date: 01 Nov 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here.


     
    Research grants  
    Institute for Aegean Prehistory  
    These promote knowledge of the Aegean region, and support archaeological fieldwork and research in the area in the chronological span of the Palaeolithic through to the eighth century BC. Grants are worth up to USD 60,000.  
    Closing date: 01 Nov 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

  
     
    Virgil Thomson fellowship  
    Society for American Music  
    This supports scholars at any phase of their careers whose research interest is focused on the history, creation and analysis of American music on stage and screen, including opera. The fellowship is worth up to USD 4,000.  
    Closing date: 01 Nov 20   
You can find more information here.


     
    Annual conference bursaries  
    British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies  
    These enable early-career scholars to attend and present at the society’s annual conference, to be held in January 2020 at the University of Oxford, UK. Up to 20 bursaries are available to cover the conference fee and the cost of the conference dinner.  
    Closing date: 01 Nov 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here.

 
     
    Project grants  
    Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection  
    These assist scholarly projects in Byzantine studies, pre-Columbian studies, and garden and landscape studies. Grants are usually between USD 3,000 and USD 10,000.  
    Closing date: 01 Nov 20   
You can find more information here.


     
    Georgian papers programme fellowship  
    Library of Congress  
    This enables scholars to pursue independent research in the Royal Archives and the Library of Congress. Fellowships are worth USD 8,000 each to cover the costs of two months in residence.  
    Closing date: 01 Nov 20  (Forecast)
You can find more information here


     
    Archibald Cason Edwards Senior and Sarah Stanley Gordon Edwards memorial travel awards  
    Western Michigan University  
    These support graduate students and emerging scholars who are presenting papers on topics in the history of European medieval art in sponsored and special sessions at the International Congress on Medieval Studies. Awards are worth USD 250 each plus waiver of registration as well as accommodation fees. 
   Closing date: 01 Nov 20   
You can find more information here

     
    Lapidus initiative fellowships for digital collections  
    Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture  
    These support research based on digitised copies of library materials relating to America before 1820. Fellowships are worth up to USD 5,000.  
    Closing date: 01 Nov 20   
You can find more information here


     
    Scholars’ workshop  
    Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture  
    This supports a period in residence at the institute to prepare a work for publication. Funding is worth up to USD 4,000.  
    Closing date: 01 Nov 20   
You can find more information here

     
    Sabbatical research fellowships  
    Institute for Humane Studies  
    These enable researchers to take semester-long sabbaticals for the study, research, and teaching of classical liberal ideas. Fellowships are worth USD 50,000 each.  
    Closing date: 01 Nov 20   
You can find more information here.


     
    OI-Mount Vernon fellowships for digital collections in the American founding era  
    Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture  
    These support digitalisation projects on materials pertaining to the founding era of American history, with particular emphasis on George Washington. Fellowships are worth up to USD 5,000 each.  
    Closing date: 01 Nov 20   
You can find more information here.


     
    Publication subvention grant  
    JR Smallwood Foundation for Newfoundland and Labrador Studies  
    This supports publications related to Newfoundland and Labrador studies by authors regardless of affiliation. Grants are worth up to CAD 5,000. 
  Closing date: 01 Nov 20   
You can find more information here

     
    Katharine Pantzer fellowship in the British book trade  
    Bibliographical Society of America  
    This supports bibliographical inquiry in the history of the book trades and publishing history in Britain during the hand-press period as well as studies of authorship, reading and collecting based on the examination of British books published in that period, with a special emphasis on descriptive bibliography. The fellowship is worth USD 3,000 for early-career scholars and USD 6,000 for senior scholars.  
    Closing date: 02 Nov 20   
You can find more information here.


     
    Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS early-career fellowships  
    American Council of Learned Societies  
    These support scholars who are preparing their PhD dissertation for publication, or who are embarking on new research projects in China. Fellowships are worth up to USD 50,000 each for two semesters.  
    Closing date: 02 Nov 20   
You can find more information here.


     
    Site preservation grant  
    Archaeological Institute of America  
    This supports preservation and protection of archaeological heritage for future generations. Grants are worth up to USD 15,000 each.  
    Closing date: 02 Nov 20   
You can find more information here


     
    Barra postdoctoral fellowship  
    McNeil Center for Early American Studies  
    This enables early-career scholars to spend time teaching and carrying out research at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Fellowships last for two years and include a stipend worth USD 52,000. 
     Closing date: 02 Nov 20   
You can find more information here.

 

Friday 28th August 2020.

Member Welcome. 

The CHRG would like to extend a warm welcome to Associate Professor Rohan Bastin!

Rohan Bastin is an anthropologist who has conducted research on religion and ethnic conflict in Sri Lanka since the mid-1980s. His experience of that country covers the period of its civil war about which he is preparing a monograph in addition to a number of already published works that focus on the history of ethnic identity formation and the role of religion in that formation. His more recent work includes a forthcoming edited collection on the state and enslavement, suicide bombing and the nature of ritual sacrifice in multiple religious traditions, and the vexed history of the doctrine and policy of secularism in India and Sri Lanka. 

 

Archive Access.

The Deakin University Library is currently conducting a trial of the British Online ArchiveThe trial will run until the 11th September. If you find this database useful, please send your feedback to Brad Adams: b.adams@deakin.edu.au 

 

Publications. 

Dr. Christopher Mayes has authored ‘White medicine, white ethics: On the historical formation of racism in Australian healthcare’, which has been published in Journal of Australian Studies. You can read it in full here

Honorary Fellow Roy Hay‘s book, Albert ‘Pompey’ Austin: A man between two worlds, has provided context to an ABC article, which was published in the lead up to the AFL’s Indigenous round. 

 

Book reviews.

Professor Phillip Deery has reviewed John Fahey’s Traitors and spies: Espionage and corruption in high places in Australia, 1901-50 for Inside Story. 

 

Australian Policy and History. 

In APH’s latest opinion piece, Dr. John Doyle and Scott Doidge survey the effect of COVID on the university sector, and urge the higher education sector to use this crisis to reinvigorate its broader mission as a pillar of civic society.

CHRG members provide leadership for the Australian Policy and History Network, a network of historians from Deakin, University of Melbourne and Australian National University that recognises the value of historical knowledge in the pursuit of better public policy outcomes and seeks to promote historians as constructive participants in public policy debates. The Australian Policy and History website publishes a range of material, such as opinion pieces, policy briefs, book reviews and author Q&As. The broad range of topics considered connects well with the methodological and content breadth of CHRG. Australian Policy and History accept submissions all year round and welcomes submissions and pitches from CHRG members. 

If you are interested in writing an opinion piece or a policy brief, please contact Carolyn Holbrook: carolyn.holbrook@deakin.edu.au 
 
If you are interested in writing a book review or conducting an author Q&A, please email your research interests to Lyndon Megarrity who can arrange a review copy: drlyndon@bigpond.net.au

 

Events. 

6pm, Tuesday 1st September: Dr. Carla Pascoe Leahy will be presenting a paper at the Melbourne Feminist History Group’s seminar. This seminar will focus on histories of motherhood. Held via Zoom, you can find the link here. 

 

Seminar Series.

Zoom invitations for Gabrielle Wolf’s seminar have been emailed to members. If you didn’t receive an invitation (or if you would like to be re-sent the zoom invitation), please contact Jacqui (bakerjacq@deakin.edu.au). We look forward to seeing you there!

2nd September: Gabrielle Wolf.
Title: ‘Machinations of the British Medical Association: Excluding Refugee Doctors from Queensland’s Medical Profession, 1937-42’.

Neal Macrossan

Abstract: When medical practitioners fled from the Nazi regime in the 1930s, the British Medical Association (BMA), the peak body for the medical profession in the British Empire, agitated strenuously to prevent ‘refugee doctors’, as they were described, from practising medicine throughout the Empire. Prominent BMA representatives pursued this agenda in Australia through their appointment to statutory state-based authorities that registered and regulated doctors. This paper discusses how, between 1937 and 1942, they sought to use those bodies’ registration and disciplinary powers in Queensland to exclude refugee doctors, despite the resistance of this state’s government to BMA pressure to pass legislation constricting their eligibility for registration. 

9th September: Tony Joel. 
Title: Roving Beyond Bongo: Teaching and Researching the History of Australian Football.
Abstract: The recent publication of On the Take, which tells the story of champion rover Alex “Bongo” Lang and the Carlton bribery scandal of 1910, exemplifies how singular episodes in Australian football history unexpectedly can become major research projects. In 2021, Deakin will introduce the new unit AST250 A History of Australian Football, 1858-2020. Tasked with creating this unit, over the next six months I will be writing curriculum that covers major episodes along with key trends and developments spanning over 150 years. I am approaching this curriculum development process with a view to not only creating a new unit, but also in anticipation that it will play an instrumental role in shaping my currently undecided research agenda over the next 3-5 years. This week’s seminar will deviate from the usual format of presenting a polished research paper followed by a short Q&A session. Instead, it will be run with a more interactive approach with everyone encouraged to join in a discussion broadly based around the teaching-research nexus. I will commence by briefly describing how the “Bongo” Lang story surprisingly materialised into a book, then will outline the structure of Deakin’s forthcoming unit on the history of Australian football and some possible research topics, before inviting seminar attendees to discuss how teaching can shape our research and vice versa.

23rd September: Niro Kandasamy and Mia Martin Hobbs. 
Title and abstract: TBA. 

30th September: Greg Burgess. 
Title and abstract: TBA. 

Opportunities.

Patrick-Jean Guay has identified funding opportunities that could be of interest to CHRG members. Patrick has requested to be notified (via the Faculty Research mailbox artsed-research-grants@deakin.edu.au) and via the completion of the Faculty on-line NOIS form (https://deakinuniversity-vcjls.formstack.com/forms/nois) if anyone is interested in applying to any of those opportunities. If you need any further assistance, please contact Patrick (patrick.guay@deakin.edu.au )   

Desmond Guinness scholarship  
    Irish Georgian Society  
    This supports research on the visual arts in the Republic of Ireland, including the work of Irish architects, artists and craftsmen at home and abroad, in the period between 1600 and 1900. In 2018, the scholarship was worth approximately €1,000.  
    Closing date: 28 Oct 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here. 
    https://www.researchprofessional.com/funding/opportunity/608172 
     
    Getty/ACLS postdoctoral fellowships in the history of art  
    Getty Foundation  
    These support an academic year of research or writing by early-career scholars for a project that will make a substantial and original contribution to the understanding of art and its history. There are 10 fellowships available, worth USD 65,000 each.  
    Closing date: 28 Oct 20   
You can find more information here.


     
    Harkness fellowship in healthcare policy and practice – Australia  
    Commonwealth Fund  
    These support mid-career professionals to work with leading US experts and study a critical issue on the health policy agenda in both the US and Australia. Fellowships are worth up to USD 190,000 each for a maximum period of one year. 
   Closing date: 28 Oct 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

  
     
    Solmsen fellowships  
    University of Wisconsin  
    These support scholars from other universities working in the humanities on European history, literature, philosophy, politics, religion, art and culture in the classical, medieval and early modern periods before 1700. The award provides a stipend of USD 57,000.  
    Closing date: 29 Oct 20   
You can find more information here.  

     
    Saluting their service commemorative grants programme – major commemorative grants  
    Department of Veterans’ Affairs  
    These support projects and activities that contribute to Australia’s understanding of its wartime heritage and honour the service and sacrifice of its servicemen and women. Grants are worth between AUD 10,001 and AUD 150,000.  
   Closing date: 29 Oct 20   
You can find more information here.


     
    Saluting their service commemorative grants programme – community commemorative grants  
    Department of Veterans’ Affairs  
    This supports community-based commemorative projects and activities that directly commemorate the involvement, service and sacrifice of Australia’s service personnel in wars, conflicts and peace operations. Grants are worth up to AUD 10,000 each for one year. 
   Closing date: 29 Oct 20   
You can find more information here

     
    Japanese research fellowship  
    Hakuho Foundation  
    This enables international researchers of the Japanese language, Japanese language education, Japanese literature and Japanese culture to conduct residential research in Japan. Fellowships cover airfares, a relocation allowance of JPY 350,000, living and research expenses of JPY 350,000 per month and a housing subsidy worth up to JPY 150,000 per month. 
    Closing date: 30 Oct 20   
You can find more information here

     
    Snorri Sturluson Icelandic fellowships  
    University of Iceland | Háskóli Íslands  
    These enable scholars to stay in Iceland in order to improve their knowledge of the Icelandic language, culture and society. Fellowships cover travel expenses to and from Iceland, plus living expenses for a period of at least three months.  
    Closing date: 31 Oct 20   
You can find more information here

     
    Kingdon fellowships  
    University of Wisconsin  
    These support scholars working in the humanities in the historical, literary, artistic, or philosophical studies of Christian or Jewish religious traditions and their role in society. The stipend is worth USD 57,000 over one year.  
    Closing date: 31 Oct 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

     
    Nurse in Washington Internship grant  
    Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses  
    This supports a member of the academy in attending the Nurse in Washington Internship event. One grant is available to cover the cost of registration and accommodation.  
    Closing date: 31 Oct 20   
You can find more information here

     
    ICSCC visiting scholars programme  
    Fudan University  
    This supports foreign researchers in pursuing independent research while in residence at Fudan University. Grants cover travel costs, subsistence, accommodation, and access to the university’s printing failities and libraries.  
    Closing date: 31 Oct 20   
You can find more information here

     
    Guido Cazzavillan research grant  
    Cà Foscari University of Venice | Università Cà Foscari degli Studi di Venezia  
    This supports research in economics to reduce inequality and poverty, with a focus on developing countries. The grant is worth €52,000 for one year. All information is in Italian.  
    Closing date: 31 Oct 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here.

 

Friday 21st August 2020. 

Achievements. 

Congratulations to Roy Hay whose book, Aboriginal People and Australian Football in the Nineteenth Century, has been shortlisted for the British Society of Sports History’s Lord Aberdare prize.

 

Publications. 

Dr. John Doyle has co-written an editorial piece that has been published in Educational Philosophy and Theory. Titled ‘Australian universities in the age of Covid’, it seeks to place the plight of Australia’s universities in some historical context, and touches on the current humanities fees-doubling issue. You can read it here

 

In the media.

Mia Spizzica has provided context to an ABC report, which details the internment of Italian-Australians during WWII. You can find the report in print and radio (listen at 14 minutes). 

 

Australian Policy and History.

You can catch up on PhD Candidate Jeff Hole’s recent piece, ‘Could Thatcher and Reagan inspire Australia’s recovery?’, which was published on the APH website earlier this week. 

 

Events. 

Launch of Australian Mothering: Historical and Sociological Perspectives (online)  

8 September 2020, 6pm AEST  

Australian Mothering defines the field of maternal studies in Australia for the first time. Editors Carla Pascoe Leahy and Petra Bueskens have curated a collection that presents compelling research on past and present perspectives on maternity in Australia. Contributors include Alison Bartlett, Deb Brennan, Judith E. Brown, Petra Bueskens, Monica Campo, Kay Cook, Lyn Craig, Patricia Grimshaw, Nicole Highet, Rebecca Jennings, Kate Johnston-Ataata, Catherine Kevin, Marilyn Lake, Karen Lane, Alison Mackinnon, Anne Manne, Paula Michaels, Kris Natalier, Carla Pascoe Leahy, Kerreen Reiger, Julie Stephens, Elizabeth Sutton, Shurlee Swain, Theun Pieter van Tienoven and Alistair Thomson. The volume will be launched by Elizabeth Hill and feature brief verbal abstracts from contributors.

Further information. 

 

Seminar series.

Zoom invitations for Hirokazu Matsui’s seminar have been emailed to members. If you didn’t receive an invitation (or if you would like to be re-sent the zoom invitation), please contact Jacqui (bakerjacq@deakin.edu.au). We look forward to seeing you there!

26th August: Hirokazu Matsui. 
Title: Australia, Japan and the Afro-Asian Bloc: Australia’s Policy towards Japan’s Return to the International Community, 1952-1956. 
Abstract: Australia’s rapprochement with Japan after the Second World War was a difficult and important political issue for Australia and has received some scholarly attention. Yet, this attention has been largely concentrated on the bilateral trade, with the conclusion of the Commerce Agreement in 1957 being seen as the culmination of this rapprochement. Without denying the importance of the trade relationship, this paper, which will form a basis for a chapter of my PhD thesis, sheds a new light on this rapprochement by revealing how the international emergence of the Afro-Asian bloc affected Australia’s policy towards Japan after the conclusion of the Peace Treaty. Mainly drawing upon archival sources in Australia and Japan, this paper closely examines how the Australian government tried to deal with Japan’s return to international society by paying particular attention to Japan’s admission into the Colombo Plan, the Bandung Conference and Japan’s admission into the United Nations. I argue that Australia became increasingly aware of Japan as a member of the Afro-Asian bloc through a process of Japan’s return to international society, especially from 1954 to 1956 and found that Japan was very reluctant to oppose a majority view of this bloc.

Photo taken by Hirokazu Matsui. Argus article titled ‘Japan joins U.N.’ on December
14, 1956 (p. 2)

Bio: Hirokazu Matsui is a PhD candidate at Deakin University. He holds a Master of Area Studies from the University of Tokyo, Japan. His research delves into archives of Australia, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States, thereby reconstructing how the Australia-Japan political relationship, especially over the South East Asia developed during the early Cold War. He is a recipient of Deakin University Postgraduate Research Scholarship. Also, he was awarded research grants from the Resona Foundation for Asia and Oceania and National Archives of Australia and Australian Historical Association. 

2nd September: Gabrielle Wolf.
Title: ‘Machinations of the British Medical Association: Excluding Refugee Doctors from Queensland’s Medical Profession, 1937-42’.

Neal Macrossan

Abstract: When medical practitioners fled from the Nazi regime in the 1930s, the British Medical Association (BMA), the peak body for the medical profession in the British Empire, agitated strenuously to prevent ‘refugee doctors’, as they were described, from practising medicine throughout the Empire. Prominent BMA representatives pursued this agenda in Australia through their appointment to statutory state-based authorities that registered and regulated doctors. This paper discusses how, between 1937 and 1942, they sought to use those bodies’ registration and disciplinary powers in Queensland to exclude refugee doctors, despite the resistance of this state’s government to BMA pressure to pass legislation constricting their eligibility for registration. 

9th September: Tony Joel. 
Title: Roving Beyond Bongo: Teaching and Researching the History of Australian Football.
Abstract: The recent publication of On the Take, which tells the story of champion rover Alex “Bongo” Lang and the Carlton bribery scandal of 1910, exemplifies how singular episodes in Australian football history unexpectedly can become major research projects. In 2021, Deakin will introduce the new unit AST250 A History of Australian Football, 1858-2020. Tasked with creating this unit, over the next six months I will be writing curriculum that covers major episodes along with key trends and developments spanning over 150 years. I am approaching this curriculum development process with a view to not only creating a new unit, but also in anticipation that it will play an instrumental role in shaping my currently undecided research agenda over the next 3-5 years. This week’s seminar will deviate from the usual format of presenting a polished research paper followed by a short Q&A session. Instead, it will be run with a more interactive approach with everyone encouraged to join in a discussion broadly based around the teaching-research nexus. I will commence by briefly describing how the “Bongo” Lang story surprisingly materialised into a book, then will outline the structure of Deakin’s forthcoming unit on the history of Australian football and some possible research topics, before inviting seminar attendees to discuss how teaching can shape our research and vice versa.

Opportunities. 

Patrick-Jean Guay has identified funding opportunities that could be of interest to CHRG members. Patrick has requested to be notified (via the Faculty Research mailbox artsed-research-grants@deakin.edu.au) and via the completion of the Faculty on-line NOIS form (https://deakinuniversity-vcjls.formstack.com/forms/nois) if anyone is interested in applying to any of those opportunities. If you need any further assistance, please contact Patrick (patrick.guay@deakin.edu.au )    

Max Weber fellowships  
    European University Institute  
    These enable early career scholars in political sciences, law, economics and humanities to spend time in one of the research centres of the European University Institute in Florence. Up to 60 fellowships are available, each cover a monthly stipend of €2,000, plus travel reimbursement, research stipend and family allowances over between one and three years.  
    Closing date: 18 Oct 20. 
You can find more information here.  
     
    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander projects grants  
    Arts South Australia  
    These support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists in the creative development, production and making of new work, including research and planning, exhibitions, presentation, performance and research projects across all art forms. Grants are worth up to AUD 25,000. 
  Closing date: 19 Oct 20.
You can find more information here.  
 
     
    Thiers-Centre Foundation scholarships  
    Institut de France  
    These support research in literature, philosophy, history, art history, archaeology or geography leading to a thesis. Up to seven scholarships, worth €21,600 each for one year, are available. All information is in French.  
    Closing date: 19 Oct 20. 
You can find more information here.

     
    EXTENDED DEADLINE: Early-career grant  
    National Geographic Society  
    *** The closing date for this opportunity has been extended. The previous deadline of 22 April has been extended to 21 October 2020. All other call details remain unchanged. This grant enables less experienced individuals to lead research, conservation, education, storytelling or technology projects. Grants are typically worth between USD 5,000 and USD 10,000 for a maximum period of one year. ***  
    Closing date: 21 Oct 20.
You can find more information here.  
 
  
 Knowledge frontiers – international interdisciplinary research projects  
    British Academy  
    This enables humanities and social sciences researchers to develop international interdisciplinary research projects in collaboration with researchers from the natural, engineering and medical sciences. Awards are worth up to £200,000 over two years.   
    Closing date: 21 Oct 20.
You can find more information here.  
 

 

Friday 14th August 2020. 

Member welcome!

CHRG would like to extend a warm welcome to our newest member, Kerri Anne Garrard. 

Dr. Kerri Anne Garrard is a lecturer in Humanities Education for the School of Education in the Faculty of Arts and Education. Kerri teaches in the field of History curriculum and pedagogy and Humanities in primary and secondary education. Before coming to Deakin, she taught History at the secondary school level from Years 7-12, developing expertise in the shaping and delivery of History curriculum in Australia. In 2019 she completed her PhD which examined the relationship between interculturality and history and its impact for the educational context.

Kerri’s main research interests focus on History curriculum and pedagogy, the evaluation of resources for History teaching and learning and the impact of interculturality on History teaching and learning in a global setting. Her research is informed by theories of interculturalism, post-colonialism and history theory relating to comparative historiography, historical consciousness, and orientations of historical thinking.

Kerri’s recent activities include the development of a new digital resource for teaching and learning about the Vietnam War. This resource will be made available to Year 10 students in Victoria and celebrates a refreshed position on the delivery and engagement of this topic in schools. Two new research projects include; a ‘health check’ of History education in Australian secondary school settings, for both compulsory and post-compulsory schooling; and another which focuses on how universities in Australia have marketed the global graduate in the past and the impact of COVID19 in establishing the less global citizen in the future; impact and consequences for higher education.

 

Publications. 

Roy Hay has recently published a book titled Albert ‘Pompey’ Austin: A man between two worlds. The blurb reads: 

Albert ‘Pompey’ Austin (Poorne Yarriworri) was a man between two worlds in the second half of the nineteenth century. He was one of the most important multi-sports Indigenous persons of that era. In his brief life he was not just a footballer, but was also a cricketer, pedestrian (as athletes were called in those days), racehorse owner, jockey, boxer, horse thief, artist, explorer, savant, entertainer and musician, and a thorn in the side of those who wished to confine him and the survivors of his generation to remote ghettos on the fringe of Victoria.

You can purchase the book through Sports & Editorial Services Australia.

 

In The Media. 

Professor David Lowe recently appeared on an episode of Rear Vision, a program on ABC’s Radio National. Titled ‘How WWII changed Australia’, this episode asks how the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the end of WWII and post-war reconstruction changed Australia. You can listen back to the episode here

 

Australian Policy and History. 

PhD Candidate Jacqui Baker reviewed Merle Thornton’s memoir, Bringing the fight. You can read it here

Neville Buch’s piece titled ‘Economic rationalism and university course pricing’ examined the Morrison governments plans to overhaul the pricing structure of university courses. Neville explains that the proposal operates on four levels. Find out more here.  

Lyndon Megarrity conducted a fascinating Q&A with Liam Byrne. They discussed Liam’s recent publication Becoming John Curtin and James Scullin. You can read the Q&A in full here

 

Seminar Series. 

Zoom invitations will be distributed to members shortly. 

26th August: Hirokazu Matsui. 
Title: Australia, Japan and the Afro-Asian Bloc: Australia’s Policy towards Japan’s Return to the International Community, 1952-1956. 
Abstract: Australia’s rapprochement with Japan after the Second World War was a difficult and important political issue for Australia and has received some scholarly attention. Yet, this attention has been largely concentrated on the bilateral trade, with the conclusion of the Commerce Agreement in 1957 being seen as the culmination of this rapprochement. Without denying the importance of the trade relationship, this paper, which will form a basis for a chapter of my PhD thesis, sheds a new light on this rapprochement by revealing how the international emergence of the Afro-Asian bloc affected Australia’s policy towards Japan after the conclusion of the Peace Treaty. Mainly drawing upon archival sources in Australia and Japan, this paper closely examines how the Australian government tried to deal with Japan’s return to international society by paying particular attention to Japan’s admission into the Colombo Plan, the Bandung Conference and Japan’s admission into the United Nations. I argue that Australia became increasingly aware of Japan as a member of the Afro-Asian bloc through a process of Japan’s return to international society, especially from 1954 to 1956 and found that Japan was very reluctant to oppose a majority view of this bloc.

Photo taken by Hirokazu Matsui. Argus article titled ‘Japan joins U.N.’ on December
14, 1956 (p. 2)

Bio: Hirokazu Matsui is a PhD candidate at Deakin University. He holds a Master of Area Studies from the University of Tokyo, Japan. His research delves into archives of Australia, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States, thereby reconstructing how the Australia-Japan political relationship, especially over the South East Asia developed during the early Cold War. He is a recipient of Deakin University Postgraduate Research Scholarship. Also, he was awarded research grants from the Resona Foundation for Asia and Oceania and National Archives of Australia and Australian Historical Association. 

2nd September: Gabrielle Wolf.
Title: ‘Machinations of the British Medical Association: Excluding Refugee Doctors from Queensland’s Medical Profession, 1937-42’.

Neal Macrossan

Abstract: When medical practitioners fled from the Nazi regime in the 1930s, the British Medical Association (BMA), the peak body for the medical profession in the British Empire, agitated strenuously to prevent ‘refugee doctors’, as they were described, from practising medicine throughout the Empire. Prominent BMA representatives pursued this agenda in Australia through their appointment to statutory state-based authorities that registered and regulated doctors. This paper discusses how, between 1937 and 1942, they sought to use those bodies’ registration and disciplinary powers in Queensland to exclude refugee doctors, despite the resistance of this state’s government to BMA pressure to pass legislation constricting their eligibility for registration. 

9th September: Tony Joel. 
Title: Roving Beyond Bongo: Teaching and Researching the History of Australian Football.
Abstract: The recent publication of On the Take, which tells the story of champion rover Alex “Bongo” Lang and the Carlton bribery scandal of 1910, exemplifies how singular episodes in Australian football history unexpectedly can become major research projects. In 2021, Deakin will introduce the new unit AST250 A History of Australian Football, 1858-2020. Tasked with creating this unit, over the next six months I will be writing curriculum that covers major episodes along with key trends and developments spanning over 150 years. I am approaching this curriculum development process with a view to not only creating a new unit, but also in anticipation that it will play an instrumental role in shaping my currently undecided research agenda over the next 3-5 years. This week’s seminar will deviate from the usual format of presenting a polished research paper followed by a short Q&A session. Instead, it will be run with a more interactive approach with everyone encouraged to join in a discussion broadly based around the teaching-research nexus. I will commence by briefly describing how the “Bongo” Lang story surprisingly materialised into a book, then will outline the structure of Deakin’s forthcoming unit on the history of Australian football and some possible research topics, before inviting seminar attendees to discuss how teaching can shape our research and vice versa.

 

Friday 7th August 2020. 

Publications. 

Associate professor Clare Corbould and her University of Sydney co-author Michael McDonnell had a piece in the Washington Post perspective series, Made by History, “African American holidays, like Aug. 1, deserve national attention”. 

Associate Professor Cassandra Atherton has a Covideo with US poet, Jonathan Penton on the New Orleans Poetry Festival website. You can watch them read their wonderful haibun poems here.  

Events. 

11th August, 5-6:30pm: Dr. Gwyn McClelland will be presenting at History Council Victoria’s webinar, ‘Remembering the atomic bombs: History, memory and politics in Australia, Japan and the pacific’. You can find registration details here

Seminar series. 

Zoom invites for Gwyn’s seminar on the 12th August have been emailed to members. If you didn’t receive an invite (or would like to be re-sent the invite), please contact Jacqui Baker (bakerjacq@deakin.edu.au) 
 
12th August: Gwyn McClelland. 
Zoom invitations to be distributed shortly. 

Title: Seventy-five years after the Nagasaki bomb: Listening to the Catholic survivors.
Abstract: I will introduce my new monograph, and my oral history work with Catholic survivors of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki. In 2019, I visited Nagasaki at the time of Pope Francis’s visit and observed the community’s response. I will discuss the changes since the 1981 visit of Pope John Paul II, who began a speech at Hiroshima, “War is the work of humanity” and how these comments have supported a transformation of the community’s previous interpretation of the atomic bombing as a part of God’s providence. The narratives of recently outspoken survivors demonstrate the resilience of a surviving community, for many years persecuted by the Japanese authorities.

Dr. McClelland holds a Master of Divinity from the University of Divinity, Melbourne, Australia and a Doctorate of Philosophy in Japanese history from Monash University. In 2020 he will teach in the Deakin University unit, “Conflict and its Legacies in Modern Asia”. Gwyn was a secondary teacher of Japanese and Geography for some twenty years and while doing his PhD at Monash he taught in Education (Bilingualism and Languages Methodology), History and the Japanese language. In 2019 he coordinated a modern Chinese history unit at Monash University, ‘The Fall and Rise of Modern China’. Gwyn is the winner of the 2019 John Legge prize for best thesis in Asian Studies, awarded by the Asian Studies Association of Australia (ASAA). Gwyn has taught at Monash, RMIT and Melbourne Universities and he has participated in recent workshops at Copenhagen University (Center for Contemporary Buddhist Studies) and the University of California, Berkeley. His monograph, based on his work interviewing Catholic survivors of the Nagasaki atomic bombing was published in 2019 by Routledge in Mark Selden’s series, “Asia’s Transformations” and is entitled ‘Dangerous Memory in Nagasaki: Prayers, Protests and Catholic Survivor Narratives’.

26th August: Hirokazu Matsui. 
Title and abstract: TBA. 

 

Friday 31st July 2020. 

Podcasts.

Undisciplinary is a new podcast created by research fellow Courtney Hempton and Dr. Christopher Mayes that talks across the boundaries of history, ethics and the politics of health. It draws on some of the research and interviews conducted for Chris’s DECRA on the history of bioethics, but will also feature interviews and discussions with people working across a variety of disciplinary spaces relating to medicine, health and society. More information can be found here or stay updated on Twitter: @undisciplinary_

Publications. 

Associate Professor Cassandra Atherton and Professor Paul Hetherington co-wrote a prose poem, Closing the Window’, for the international project, 100 Words of Solitude, 100 international responses to Covid-19 and ‘Legacy’ In Your HandsAnthology, Red Room Poetry, NSW, 2020. 

Dr. Rebecca Cairns has had an article published in the Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy. Titled ‘Recognizing, reproducing and resisting West as method discourse: An analysis of senior secondary Asia-related history curriculum enactment’, you can read the article in full here

Seminar Series. 

The seminar series for trimester two is held via Zoom on Wednesdays at 11am. Zoom invitations have been distributed for the upcoming seminars on 5th and 12th August. If you haven’t received a Zoom invitation and would like to attend, please contact Jacqui Baker (bakerjacq@deakin.edu.au)

5th August: Andrea Witcomb.
Title: ‘Nature’s marvels’: The value of collections extracted from colonial Western Australia.

Figure 1: Tunney processing specimens in the field, no location recorded, c.1900, Western Australian Museum.

Abstract: This paper, coauthored with Alistair Paterson, seeks to make a contribution to the study of the history of collecting by arguing for the importance of understanding the ways in which the value of collections to collectors, institutions and knowledge producers was produced. We call this focus on value an Extractive Value Adding Approach (EVAA) to collection studies. Our deployment of this approach reveals not only the close relationship between collecting practices and colonialism, but the ways in which values are made not given and the processes involved in their production. By revealing the social context to these processes our hope is that new values for these collections can be produced, values that might address the colonial legacies embedded in the making of these collections and the purposes and values to which they were put to at the time of their making.

12th August: Gwyn McClelland. 
Zoom invitations to be distributed shortly. 

Title: Seventy-five years after the Nagasaki bomb: Listening to the Catholic survivors. 
Abstract: I will introduce my new monograph, and my oral history work with Catholic survivors of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki. In 2019, I visited Nagasaki at the time of Pope Francis’s visit and observed the community’s response. I will discuss the changes since the 1981 visit of Pope John Paul II, who began a speech at Hiroshima, “War is the work of humanity” and how these comments have supported a transformation of the community’s previous interpretation of the atomic bombing as a part of God’s providence. The narratives of recently outspoken survivors demonstrate the resilience of a surviving community, for many years persecuted by the Japanese authorities.

Dr. McClelland holds a Master of Divinity from the University of Divinity, Melbourne, Australia and a Doctorate of Philosophy in Japanese history from Monash University. In 2020 he will teach in the Deakin University unit, “Conflict and its Legacies in Modern Asia”. Gwyn was a secondary teacher of Japanese and Geography for some twenty years and while doing his PhD at Monash he taught in Education (Bilingualism and Languages Methodology), History and the Japanese language. In 2019 he coordinated a modern Chinese history unit at Monash University, ‘The Fall and Rise of Modern China’. Gwyn is the winner of the 2019 John Legge prize for best thesis in Asian Studies, awarded by the Asian Studies Association of Australia (ASAA). Gwyn has taught at Monash, RMIT and Melbourne Universities and he has participated in recent workshops at Copenhagen University (Center for Contemporary Buddhist Studies) and the University of California, Berkeley. His monograph, based on his work interviewing Catholic survivors of the Nagasaki atomic bombing was published in 2019 by Routledge in Mark Selden’s series, “Asia’s Transformations” and is entitled ‘Dangerous Memory in Nagasaki: Prayers, Protests and Catholic Survivor Narratives’.

Opportunities. 

Patrick-Jean Guay has identified funding opportunities that could be of interest to CHRG members. Patrick has requested to be notified (via the Faculty Research mailbox artsed-research-grants@deakin.edu.au) and via the completion of the Faculty on-line NOIS form (https://deakinuniversity-vcjls.formstack.com/forms/nois) if anyone is interested in applying to any of those opportunities. If you need any further assistance, please contact Patrick (patrick.guay@deakin.edu.au )    

Edilia and François-Auguste de Montêquin research fellowship 
    Society of Architectural Historians 
    This supports travel related to research on Spanish, Portuguese or Ibero-American architecture, including colonial architecture produced by the Spaniards in the Philippines and the US. The fellowship is worth USD 2,000 for an advanced graduate student and USD 6,000 for a senior or emerging scholar.
Closing date: 30 Sep 20  (Forecast). 
You can find more information here.     
     
    Fernand Braudel senior fellowships 
    European University Institute 
    These enable established academics with an international reputation to pursue their research at the European University Institute. Fellowships are worth up to €3,000 per month for between three and 10 months. 
    Closing date: 30 Sep 20 
You can find more information here.


   Japan world exposition commemorative fund grants 
    Commemorative Organization for the Japan World Exposition 
    These fund projects that commemorate the success of the Japan world exposition 1970 and and contribute to international understanding. Available grants range between JPY 500,000 and JPY 10 million. 
    Closing date: 30 Sep 20 
You can find more information here.  

     
    H Allen Brooks travelling fellowship 
    Society of Architectural Historians 
    This enables a recent graduate or emerging scholar to travel in order to observe, read, write or sketch. Fellowships cover expenses incurred by the fellow for one year of travel. 
    Closing date: 30 Sep 20  (Forecast) 
You can find more information here.  

     
    Berry fund on public philosophy 
    American Philosophical Association 
    This supports the work of the American Philosophical Association committee on public philosophy, whose goal is to find and create opportunities to demonstrate the personal value and social usefulness of philosophy. 
    Closing date: 30 Sep 20 
You can find more information here.

     
    Research groups 
    Austrian Science Fund 
    These enable researchers independent of location to form a research group at Austrian research institutions. The total budget is worth €1.5 million and covers personnel costs, material, equipment, travel, five per cent of general project costs and other expenses. 
    Closing date: 30 Sep 20 
You can find more information here

     
    FIFA research scholarships 
    International Sports Study Centre | Centre International d’Études du Sport 
    This supports academic research related to football. In previous years the scholarship was worth up to USD 30,000 for a maximum of one year. 
    Closing date: 30 Sep 20 
You can find more information here.  

     
    EXTENDED DEADLINE: Learning and teaching small grant 
    British International Studies Association 
    *** The closing date for this opportunity has been extended. The previous deadline of 30 April has been extended to 30 September 2020. All other call details remain unchanged. This grant supports members of the association in undertaking a discrete piece of international studies-related teaching activity or pedagogical research. Two grants are typically available, each worth up to £3,000 for a maximum period of one year. *** 
    Closing date: 30 Sep 20 
You can find more information here.  

   
     
  Professional development grants 
    Museums Association 
    These support the education and training of members participation in events. 
    Closing date: 30 Sep 20 
You can find more information here


     
  General grants 
    Esperantic Studies Foundation 
    These support universities and non-profit organisations which have needs that strongly align with the foundation’s priorities in the areas of conservation and education, as well as research relevant to Esperantic studies. Small financial requests are preferred, although grants of up to USD 10,000 are occasionally awarded. 
 Closing date: 30 Sep 20 
You can find more information here.  

     
    Modern slavery policy and human rights and evidence centre – support for victims and survivors of modern slavery 
    Arts and Humanities Research Council 
    This supports original, collaborative research that improves the current support system for victims and survivors of modern slavery, in order to fulfil their individual needs in short-term and longer-term recovery. Projects worth up to £300,000 will be funded at 80 percent of the full economic costs for up to one year. 
    Closing date: 30 Sep 20 
You can find more information here.  

     
    Special funding for system-level research into climate change mitigation and adaptation 
    Academy of Finland | Suomen Akatemia 
    This supports system-level research aimed at mitigating and adapting to climate change and for increasing the impact of the conducted research. The total budget is €10 million for grants worth between €1.2m and €1.7m per consortium. 
    Closing date: 30 Sep 20 
You can find more information here


 DG ENV/MSFD 2020 marine strategy framework directive – support to the preparation of the next six year cycle of implementation 
    Directorate-General for the Environment 
    This supports cooperation between countries for the protection of environment in marine and subregions. The total budget is approximately €4.7 million and grants are worth between €400,000 and €1 million between 12 months and 24 months. 
    Closing date: 30 Sep 20 
You can find more information here.  

     
    European co-ordinated action on improving justification of computed tomography 
    Directorate-General for Energy 
    The tenderer will conduct a study which should aim to support and stimulate EU member states’ efforts in auditing justification of medical exposures and improve the knowledge on the justification of computed tomography examinations in Europe. The contract is worth €350,000 over 36 months. 
    Closing date: 30 Sep 20 
You can find more information here.  

     
    Franklin research grants 
    American Philosophical Society 
    These support scholars with the costs of research. Grants are worth up to USD 6,000 each. 
    Closing date: 01 Oct 20 
You can find more information here

  
    Lizette Peterson-Homer injury prevention grant 
    American Psychological Association 
    This supports research into psychological and behavioural aspects of the prevention of injuries in children and adolescents through accidents, violence, abuse or suicide. The grant is worth up to USD 5,000. 
    Closing date: 01 Oct 20 
You can find more information here.  

  
     
    Strategic grants 
    International Visegrad Fund 
    These support long-term projects relevant to Visegrad group countries that link entities of all four countries. Funding has no upper limit, grants are worth €40,000 on average. Projects may last between 12 and 36 months. 
    Closing date: 01 Oct 20 
You can find more information here.  

     
    Fellowship grant for alternatives to animal research in human health and sex differences 
    American Fund for Alternatives to Animal Research 
    This supports a postdoctoral female scientist interested in developing, validating or using alternatives to animal methods in the investigation of human health or sex differences. The grant is worth USD 40,000 over one year with a possibility for renewal. 
    Closing date: 01 Oct 20 
You can find more information here


    Film grants 
    Claims Conference 
    These support the research, development and production of films about the Holocaust. Grants worth up to USD 20,000 are available for the development phase, and grants worth up to USD 60,000 are available for the production or post-production phase. 
    Closing date: 01 Oct 20 
You can find more information here


    Visegrad grants 
    International Visegrad Fund 
    These support projects that contribute to regional cooperation and advancement of innovativeness and sustainability in Central and Eastern Europe, with focus on the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia (V4). The average award is worth €20,000 over up to 18 months. 
    Closing date: 01 Oct 20 
You can find more information here


     
    Visegrad+ grants 
    International Visegrad Fund 
    These support projects which contribute to the democratisation and transformation processes in selected countries and regions, especially non-EU member states in the Western Balkans and the Eastern Partnership countries. The average grant is worth €20,000 over up to 18 months. 
    Closing date: 01 Oct 20 
You can find more information here. 


     
    Reagan-Fascell democracy fellows programme – scholarly track 
    National Endowment for Democracy 
    This enables scholars to conduct original research for publication on the political, social, economic, legal or cultural aspects of democratic development while in residence at the National Endowment for Democracy in Washington, DC. Fellowships are for five months. 
    Closing date: 01 Oct 20 
You can find more information here


     
    Pilot project awards 
    Society for Libyan Studies 
    These enable postdoctoral scholars to publish research or undertake initial exploratory work or a feasibility study prior to making applications for major funding. Grants are worth up to £3,000. 
    Closing date: 01 Oct 20 
You can find more information here.


     
  COMING SOON: Barbro Klein fellowship programme 
    Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study 
    *** This opportunity will be available soon. The next call is expected to close on 1 October 2020. The following information is subject to change. This fellowship programme aims to advance the study of cultural diversity in a global perspective. The fellowship includes monthly salary, the size of which is decided after a consultation, and accommodation. *** 
    Closing date: 01 Oct 20  (Forecast) 
You can find more information here.  

 

Friday 24th July 2020. 

Publications.

After images surfaced this week of SAS soldiers posing with a Confederate flag proclaiming “Southern Pride” in Afghanistan in 2012, Associate Professor Clare Corbould wrote an explainer for The Conversation: “Why is the Confederate flag so offensive? 

Associate Professor Cassandra Atherton has a poem, ‘News Fast’, anthologised in No News: 90 Poets Reflect on a Unique BBC Newscast, Paul Munden, Alvin Pang and Shane Strange, eds, Recent Work Press, Canberra, Australia, 2020.  Cassandra was asked to record a reading of her poem, which can be accessed here

Dr. David Wetherell has been busy writing an Introduction for a forthcoming book. Titled Cook Islander missionaries in British New Guinea (Papua) 1872 to 1914 vol II, the book commemorates the Bicentenary of the founding of Takamoa Theological College Rarotonga in 1821.  Publication is expected by the end of this month. 

Book reviews. 

Dr. Christopher Mayes has reviewed James Dunk’s Bedlam at Botany Bay. You can read the review here

Seminar series.

29th July: Henry Reese.
Zoom invitations were sent out earlier this week. If you missed out on a Zoom invitation please contact Jacqui Baker (bakerjacq@deakin.edu.au)
Title: A Microhistory of an Australian Soundscape: Listening to the First Phonograph in Warrnambool, 1896–97.
Abstract: Histories of sound recording have emphasised the rapid global spread of the ‘talking machine’ following its invention in the United States in the final quarter of the nineteenth century. Historians have emphasised the technology’s ability to facilitate cultures of mobility and connection across vast distances in its early years. This paper takes a narrower focus, exploring the intensely local configurations and negotiations that attended on the arrival of sound recording technology in late colonial Australia. By offering a close reading of the first phonograph in the town of Warrnambool in the Western District of Victoria, I demonstrate that early demonstrations of recorded sound could encourage audiences to listen closely to their local acoustic environments. Using newspaper reports and personal papers, I reconstruct the career of Thomas Rome, who performed with his sound recording technology at the Warrnambool Industrial and Arts Exhibition in 1896–97, exploring the economic, social and cultural factors that brought this piece of machinery to a regional Australian community. I argue that, when we embed it deeply in its local context, Thomas Rome’s phonograph highlights the connections between local community, settler colonialism, and emerging cultures of global modernity.
Henry Reese completed his PhD at the University of Melbourne in 2019. His doctoral thesis, ‘Colonial Soundscapes,’ was the first cultural history of early sound recording in Australia. His research combines histories of sound and the senses with histories of race and colonialism, business and popular culture. In 2019 he was awarded the AHA’s Ken Inglis Prize and Economic History Society of Australia and NZ Postgraduate Development Prize. He is currently working as a research assistant on several ARC projects, as well as doing the audio production for the University of Melbourne’s Forum podcast. He is also a musician, with two solo albums released on record labels in London and Brisbane.
 
12th August: Gwyn McClelland. 
Zoom invitations to be distributed shortly. 

Title: Seventy-five years after the Nagasaki bomb: Listening to the Catholic survivors. 
Abstract: I will introduce my new monograph, and my oral history work with Catholic survivors of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki. In 2019, I visited Nagasaki at the time of Pope Francis’s visit and observed the community’s response. I will discuss the changes since the 1981 visit of Pope John Paul II, who began a speech at Hiroshima, “War is the work of humanity” and how these comments have supported a transformation of the community’s previous interpretation of the atomic bombing as a part of God’s providence. The narratives of recently outspoken survivors demonstrate the resilience of a surviving community, for many years persecuted by the Japanese authorities.

Dr. McClelland holds a Master of Divinity from the University of Divinity, Melbourne, Australia and a Doctorate of Philosophy in Japanese history from Monash University. In 2020 he will teach in the Deakin University unit, “Conflict and its Legacies in Modern Asia”. Gwyn was a secondary teacher of Japanese and Geography for some twenty years and while doing his PhD at Monash he taught in Education (Bilingualism and Languages Methodology), History and the Japanese language. In 2019 he coordinated a modern Chinese history unit at Monash University, ‘The Fall and Rise of Modern China’. Gwyn is the winner of the 2019 John Legge prize for best thesis in Asian Studies, awarded by the Asian Studies Association of Australia (ASAA). Gwyn has taught at Monash, RMIT and Melbourne Universities and he has participated in recent workshops at Copenhagen University (Center for Contemporary Buddhist Studies) and the University of California, Berkeley. His monograph, based on his work interviewing Catholic survivors of the Nagasaki atomic bombing was published in 2019 by Routledge in Mark Selden’s series, “Asia’s Transformations” and is entitled ‘Dangerous Memory in Nagasaki: Prayers, Protests and Catholic Survivor Narratives’.

 

Friday 17th July 2020. 

Publications. 

CHRG History and Policy Research Fellow Mia Martin Hobbs has published an article in The Conversation. Drawing on her doctoral research with Australian and American war veterans who returned to Vietnam after the war, Mia argues that Spike Lee’s film, Da 5 Bloods, misrepresents the Vietnamese as resentful towards returning veterans.  

Mia Martin Hobbs has a forthcoming book publication with Cambridge University Press. Return to Vietnam: An Oral History of American and Australian Veterans’ Journeys will be published in 2021.

Associate Professor Cassandra Atherton is a guest poet at Poetry on the Move in 2020-21.  She recorded a poem for the Well Known Corners feature on their website

Roy Hay has recently written a piece which appeared in The Footy Almanac, titled ‘What happened next and what didn’t: Victorian Aboriginal involvement in Australian Football in the 21st Century’.

In the media. 

Dr Jason Gibson was interviewed for a documentary film concerning the earliest anthropological description of an Aboriginal initiation ceremony. The film is being produced with members of the Yuin Aboriginal community and the Gulaga dancers, on the south coast of New South Wales.

Opportunities. 

Patrick-Jean Guay has identified opportunities that could be of interest to CHRG members. Patrick has requested to be notified (via the Faculty Research mailbox artsed-research-grants@deakin.edu.au) and via the completion of the Faculty on-line NOIS form (https://deakinuniversity-vcjls.formstack.com/forms/nois) if anyone is interested in applying to any of those opportunities. If you need any further assistance, please contact Patrick (patrick.guay@deakin.edu.au )    

Study grants from the Oscar Ekmans foundation  
    Ekmanstiftelserna  
    These support education about Sweden at Swedish schools abroad, Swedish language education at foreign universities and schools, as well as foreign Swedish children and young people in accessing education in Sweden.  
    Closing date: 15 Sep 20   
You can find more information here

     
    Milliard Meiss publication fund  
    College Art Association  
    This supports the publication of manuscripts of high scholarly and intellectual merit that may not generate adequate financial return.  
    Closing date: 15 Sep 20   
You can find more information here

     
    Richard Plaschka fellowship postdoc  
    Austrian Exchange Service  
    This enables postdoctoral researchers whose main focus is Austrian history to work as visiting researchers and carry out specialist studies in libraries, archives or at research institutions in Austria. Up to seven grants are available, each worth €1,150 per month for up to 18 months, with the possibility of follow-up support.  
    Closing date: 15 Sep 20   
You can find more information here
 
    Medieval studies scholarships  
    Zeno Karl Schindler Foundation  
    These support scientific research in the field of medieval studies or connected medieval research branches by young researchers. Funding is worth CHF 2,500 per month for three to six months.  
    Closing date: 15 Sep 20 
You can find more information here.


   Publication grants – Asia-Pacific region  
    Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange  
    These support the publication of scholarly works related to Chinese studies in the humanities and social sciences. Grants are worth up to USD 10,000 each.  
     Closing date: 15 Sep 20   
You can find more information here

     
    Terra Foundation for American Art international publication grant  
    College Art Association  
    This supports book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of American art, visual studies and related subjects that are under contract with a publisher. Awards are worth up to USD 15,000.  
    Closing date: 15 Sep 20   
You can find more information here

     
    David Thompson grant for research in Canadian cartography
Royal Canadian Geographical Society | Société Géographique Royale du Canada  
    This supports research projects within the area of Canadian Cartography. The grant is worth up to CAD 10,000.  
    Closing date: 15 Sep 20   
You can find more information here.     
     
    Grants programme  
    National Endowment for Democracy  
    This supports organisations worldwide working to advance democratic goals and strengthen democratic institutions. Grants are worth approximately USD 50,000 and typically last for 12 months.  
    Closing date: 19 Sep 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

 

Friday 10th July 2020. 

Congratulations.

Jo Chandler has been awarded the 2020 Sean Dorney Grant for Pacific Journalism (along with Nic Maclellan) for her project ‘Degrees of Change: The fight for climate justice in the Pacific’.  Established by the Walkley Foundation, the Sean Dorney Grant for Pacific Journalism aims to encourage more and better journalism about the Pacific Islands region by Australian media professionals and news outlets. 
The judges were impressed by Jo Chandler’s proposal to examine the pressing issue of climate change in the Pacific. They were taken with her idea to bring us not a narrative of passive and powerless victims, but instead one of how individuals and communities are adapting to this dangerous and dynamic new state, and to ask what tools and resources they are working with to adjust, with a particular focus on the burden on women. 

Mia Martin Hobbs has received commendations for the AHA Serle Award. This biannual award is given to the best postgraduate thesis in Australian history. The judges thought that Mia’s thesis, ‘Nostalgia and the warzone home: American and Australian Veterans return to Viet Nam, 1981-2016’, offered new insights into war, public, and private memory. You can read the comments in full here

PhD Candidate Lee Sulkowska has been awarded the 2019 Vice Chancellor’s Prize for her Honours thesis ‘Death in the Colonial Garden: British Ideals and Settler Realities’. The Vice Chancellor’s prize is awarded to the top four honour students with the highest academic record in each Faculty. 

Publications.

Associate Professor Cassandra Atherton has written an artist’s statement, “What is Dark Poetry”, which has been published in Axon Journal. Cassandra has reflected on Dark Poetry and has offered five considerations. 

Cassandra Atherton and CHRG associate member Professor Paul Hetherington have full length poetry collections, Leftovers and Typewriter, published with Life Before Man.

Seminar series.

CHRG is pleased to announce that the seminar series is back in trimester 2. This time round, we will have a mix of presentations with Q&As and some discussion of pre-circulated papers. We kick off this Wednesday with Filip Slaveski.

This presentation will be held via Zoom. For an invitation, and a copy of Filip’s paper, please contact Jacqui Baker (bakerjacq@deakin.edu.au) 

Date and time: Wednesday 15th July, 11am-12pm.

Title: “Resistance is not Futile” – Oleksandr Shumskyi vs Joseph Stalin, 1926-1946.

Abstract: Victims of mass repression in Stalin’s Soviet Union were subject to physical and psychological torture by their interrogators, forced to confess to crimes they did not commit. Many eventually broke under this torture, accepting that continuing to resist the interrogations was pointless as well believing their interrogators’ assurances that confessing would save their lives. The interrogators lied. Confessing rarely saved the victim’s lives—it was often the last step to their execution. As evident in the vast literature on the victims of Soviet repression, their initial resistance and, indeed, eventual compliance to the state, was futile.

The case of Ukrainian communist Oleksandr Shumskyi encourages us to rethink the futility of resistance. Shumskyi survived his tortures exactly by continuing to resist them for over a decade and waging his own campaign against his unlawful arrest. By refusing to confess to the false charges made against him, Shumskyi denied his interrogators one of the key pieces of evidence they required to help demonstrate the “legality”, however perverse, of their investigations against him and others. For the state, his refusal denied it the legitimacy of its violence and stumbled the machinery of its repression. This book examines the relationship between resistance and survival by focusing on Shumskyi’s arrest and incarceration from 1933 to his death in 1946, within a broader analysis of the fate of his associates within the Ukrainian political elite and intelligentsia also arrested at this time. It draws on unique declassified security files to analyse the state’s response to such resistance and asks what impact it had on the course of mass repression. This examination opens a small window into the obscure history of non-compliant political criminals who survived for years within the Soviet penal system without confessing. It reveals new insights into the history of mass repression and has significant implications for the contemporary remembrance of victims of communism in Ukraine, across the post-Soviet space and in the West.

Friday 3rd July 2020. 

Membership welcome. 

CHRG welcomes its newest member, Dr. Ali Mozaffari

Ali is interested in understanding the various uses of the past in the present and how those uses may canvas alternative futures. Ali is, therefore, interested in the politics of the past, and the use and role of material culture in transmitting, sustaining or contesting shared identities and histories. Generally, this falls within the remit of critical heritage studies. Ali is critical of two related processes: the understanding and deconstruction of relationships of power, and more importantly, to the application of critical thinking, underpinned by scepticism, to claims advanced in heritage scholarship itself as much as the social-historical relationships addressed by that scholarship. The research utilises various methods and builds on his previous experience in the fields of the built environment (as an architect and urbanist) and heritage studies. Geographically, Ali focus on West Asia and the Caucasus. Much of his work has been on Iran (and he has life experience of living in Middle Eastern countries). Ali’s current projects are focussed in on South Caucasus, particularly the Republic of Azerbaijan.

You can read more about his work here

Publications.

Dr. Bart Ziino and Anne-Marie Condé (National Archives of Australia) are guest editors of the just-released special issue of Archives and Manuscripts on the theme ‘Engaging with war records: Archival histories and historical practice’.

The First World War (1914-1918) produced an explosion of record making and record keeping, from state agencies conducting a war of unparalleled scale, to individuals and families producing testaments of experience which also often became objects of remembrance and memorialisation.  The effort to document has a history; so too does the determination—or otherwise—to retain those records, organise and describe them, and provide for or otherwise deny access to them.  In turn, the ways in which contemporaries recorded and then archived the First World War have powerfully shaped the kinds of histories produced over the last century. The war was being recorded and archived as it happened – and for decades after – for particular reasons and particular purposes. The processes of recording and archiving have bequeathed in different times and places alternately a very rich, very partial, and very prejudiced record of conflict and its legacies.  This special issue of Archives and Manuscriptsgrew out of a 2018 conference, hosted by the International Society for First World War Studies and supported by the Contemporary Histories Research Group, taking as its theme ‘Writing, narrating and archiving the First World War’. This selection of papers from that conference revisits the creation, recreation and transmission of knowledge about the war.  Together, a series of archivists and historians investigate the ways in which a war that has been so critical not only to defining the modern world, but also individual and cultural identities, has been shaped and reshaped by those who recorded and archived its record for a century since 1914.

The special issue is available here.  Bart and Anne-Marie’s introductory essay is on open access.Associate Professor Cassandra Atherton edited Scars: Anthology of Microlit. This collection, which includes CHRG members Dr. Alyson Miller and Professor Paul Hetherington, has an introduction and piece of microlit written by Gabrielle Fletcher, director of NIKERI.

Still Here: Poetic. Portraits of Older Australians. This book is edited by Cassandra Atherton and Jessica Wilkinson and based on interviews with older Australians.  Supported by an Australia Council Grant and VicArts grant, the poetic biographies are written by Australian poets and accompanied by watercolours of the older person.

In the media.

Last week, the Uniting Church’s Victoria/Tasmania Synod became involved after volunteers at a church charity shop in Horsham declined to stop selling golliwogs. Associate Professor Clare Corbould provided context for an ABC report, available in print and radio (from 10:40). 

Opportunities.  

Ken Inglis Postgraduate Prize 2020.

The Ken Inglis prize is usually presented to the best paper presented by a postgraduate student at The Australian Historical Association conference. In the absence of a 2020 conference, it will awarded to the best paper submitted by a postgraduate student intending to present at the 2020 conference (please click on the picture to enlarge for more details). 

Patrick-Jean Guay has identified opportunities that could be of interest to CHRG members. Patrick has requested to be notified (via the Faculty Research mailbox artsed-research-grants@deakin.edu.au) and via the completion of the Faculty on-line NOIS form (https://deakinuniversity-vcjls.formstack.com/forms/nois) if anyone is interested in applying to any of those opportunities. If you need any further assistance, please contact Patrick (patrick.guay@deakin.edu.au )     
     
    Social Policy in Africa conference travel grants  
    Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa  
    These provide support for individuals presenting papers at the Social Policy in Africa conference, to be held from 25 until 27 November 2019 at the University of South Africa in Tshwane. A limited number of grants are available.  
Closing date: 30 Aug 20  (Forecast) . 
You can find more information here
     
    Conference awards  
    Handel Institute  
    These support individuals who wish to attend an overseas conference in order to read a paper on a Handel-related subject that has already been accepted by the conference organisers. Awards may be used towards travel and accommodation costs. 
     Closing date: 31 Aug 20. 
You can find more information here

    Information materials on nature and biodiversity  
    Directorate-General for the Environment  
    The tenderer will perform communication activities focusing on the production of information materials that support the implementation of EU nature and biodiversity policy. The contract is worth a total of €510,000 over 36 months.  
    Closing date: 31 Aug 20   
You can find more information here

     
    Grants  
    Aboriginal Benefits Foundation  
    These enable Aboriginal communities and individuals to undertake projects that advance the aims of the foundation, with the current focus on supporting art, literacy, education health and cultural projects with a connection to Aboriginal art or artists.
Closing date: 01 Sep 20.
You can find more information here.  


  Publication support programme  
    Korea Foundation  
    This aims to encourage the publication of Korea-related books in fields such as the humanities, social sciences, art or culture in languages other than Korean. Grants are worth up to USD 20,000 each.  
    Closing date: 02 Sep 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more information here

 Creative Koori projects funding   
    Create NSW  
    This aims to build support for a strong, resilient and exciting Aboriginal arts and cultural sector for New South Wales.   
    Closing date: 02 Sep 20  (Forecast). 
You can find more information here

 

Friday 24th June 2020. 

In the media. 

Professor Phillip Deery and Dr Julie Kimber feature in this Radio National program, ‘The Ferry Plot’. The ABC blurb reads: 

“It’s one of the strangest episodes in the history of Cold war Australia. In 1949, an incident that became known as The Ferry Plot, gripped the nation. At its heart was one man who confounded friends, authorities and later historians. But there was also a bigger story taking place that went right to the heart of Australian politics during these uncertain post war years.. In this program, the culprit himself William Dobson, rises from the grave to respond to historian Phillip Deery’s dogged investigation.” 

The program will be broadcast on ‘The History Listen’ on 27 June at 5pm on RN or can be downloaded here

Associate Professor Tony Joel was recently interview by Bob Murphy and Andy Maher on SEN Drive about his recent book On the take: The 1910 scandal that changed Australian Football Forever. You can listen back to the interview here. On the take was also mentioned on The Front Bar on Channel 7 earlier this week. 

Publications. 

PhD Candidate Anna Kent has written an important and timely piece that stresses the importance of international education and the role that it has played in shaping Australia as a nation. Titled “International education is not just important for universities, it has shaped our nation”, you can read it here

Associate Professor Cassandra Atherton was commissioned to write ‘Asphyxia’ and ‘Japanese Bath’, for the international journal McQueen’s Quinterly, Issue 3, May 2020. 

Cassandra has also published a poem, ‘La Grippe’, The In/completeness of Human Experience, in Text Special Issue, Number 58, April 2020. Selected to be re-published in The Incomplete Book, Recent Work Press, Canberra, ACT, 2020. 

Opportunities. 

Patrick-Jean Guay has identified opportunities that could be of interest to CHRG members. Patrick has requested to be notified (via the Faculty Research mailbox artsed-research-grants@deakin.edu.au) and via the completion of the Faculty on-line NOIS form (https://deakinuniversity-vcjls.formstack.com/forms/nois) if anyone is interested in applying to any of those opportunities. If you need any further assistance, please contact Patrick (patrick.guay@deakin.edu.au )

Joining up to minimise poverty grants
 
    Atlas Network  
    These support projects that aim to spread awareness to new audiences of how poverty can be reduced by increasing economic freedom. Grants are worth up to USD 15,000 each.  
    Closing date: 15 Aug 20   
You can find more info here

     
    Study grants from the Oscar Ekmans foundation  
    Ekmanstiftelserna  
    These support education about Sweden at Swedish schools abroad, Swedish language education at foreign universities and schools, as well as foreign Swedish children and young people in accessing education in Sweden.  
    Closing date: 17 Aug 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more info here

     
    South Australian History Fund grants  
    History SA  
    These support the production and dissemination of research into South Australia’s history. Grants are worth up to AUD 5,000 each.  
    Closing date: 17 Aug 20   
You can find more info here

     
    Research fellowship programme  
    Canadian Centre for Architecture  
    This supports innovative, advanced research to foster new kinds of intellectual exchange that spark long-term dialogue and debate. Fellowships include a monthly stipend worth CAD 5,000 for one to two months.  
    Closing date: 18 Aug 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more info here. 

     
    Power and accountability programme grants  
    Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust  
    These support projects that aim to create a world in which power is more equally shared and powerful institutions are responsive and accountable to wider society and aligned with the long-term public interest.   
    Closing date: 24 Aug 20   
You can find more info here

     
    Travel fellowships for international scholars  
    College Art Association  
    These support international scholars participating as speakers at the association’s annual conference. Fellowships include a portion of airfare or other travel expenses and complimentary conference registration.  
    Closing date: 26 Aug 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more info here

     
    Visions of Australia  
    Australian Government Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications  
    This aims to increase access for Australian audiences to exhibitions of Australian arts and cultural material, with a particular focus on tours to regional and remote Australia. The budget for this round is AUD 1.2 million.  
    Closing date: 28 Aug 20  (Forecast)  
You can find more info here


Friday 19th June 2020. 

Urgent Histories. 

Earlier this week, The Australian Historical Association published their forum “Doing History in Urgent Times.” A number of historians were invited to write responses to the forum, including Professor David Lowe and Professor Klaus Neumann, which have been published on Australian Policy and History

David‘s piece, coauthored with James Walter, titled ‘Urgent histories and making decisions‘, places an emphasis on economics and communication. Klaus‘ piece, titled ‘Ever-present possibilities and the status quo,’ urges historians to reflect on their practices and to rethink history’s relationship to the past, present and future. 

Black lives matter. 

The past few weeks have seen unprecedented support for sustained protests against police brutality in the US. Associate Professor Clare Corbould explained some of the root causes of the protests in a widely-shared piece in The Conversation, “The fury in US cities is rooted in a long history of racist policing, violence and inequality.” 

Clare also discussed this history on local radio in Melbourne, Adelaide, and northern Tasmania as well as ABC’s PM. 

In light of Scott Morrison’s admonition that Australians need not “import” racism, Clare drew on her most recent research to write “Black and
Blak Lives Matter: the long connected anti-racist struggle.”

Publications. 

Dr. Jonathon Ritchie‘s article, ‘From the Grassroots: Bernard Narokobi and the Making of Papua New Guinea’s Constitution,’ has just appeared as part of a special issue of The Journal of Pacific History. You can read it here

Dr. Carolyn Holbrook‘s chapter titled ‘Gendered Perspectives on War and Nationhood: The Prism of Anzac’ published in How Gender Can Transform the Social Sciences: Innovation and Impact, edited by Marian Sawer, Fiona Jenkins and Karen Downing, has been recently released through Palgrave Macmillan. 

Dr. Alyson Miller and Associate Professor Cassandra Atherton have a forthcoming article in TEXT, titled ‘“The Chernobyl Hibakusha”: Dark Poetry, The Ineffable, and Abject Realities’. The paper examines poetry written by survivors of the Chernobyl disaster, or inspired by witness testimony, and explores the ways in which such literature, which we describe as ‘dark poetry’, contributes towards thanatourism, as well as performing anti-nuclear activism.   

Alyson has recently published an article titled ‘Reading Gender, Power and Violence in Naomi Alderman’s
The Power’, in College Literature. The article examines gendered violence in a series of speculative fictions, focussing in particular on Naomi Alderman’s The Power, and its complex negotiations of patriarchal oppression. 

Alyson has also recently published an article about contemporary examples of poetry plagiarism in
Axon, titled ‘Ramshackle Girls and Sleuthing Gatekeepers: Plagiarism, Poetry, and the Critical Art of Theft’. The paper analyses how literary plagiarism reveals a series of conceptual and practical fissures, not only about form, but also privilege, trauma, and truth.

Dr. Kristine Moruzi has recently coauthored an article with Natalie Coulter. Titled “Woke girls: From The Girl’s Realm to Teen Vogue” and published in Feminist Media Studies, this article places the girls magazine Teen Vogue within the broader history of girls print culture. You can read it here

In his most recent piece for Inside Story, titled ‘Tipping points‘, Professor Klaus Neumann writes about the anti lockdown protests in Germany and explains that these protests are about more than the coronavirus.  

Klaus has coauthored an article with Savitri Taylor which has recently been published in the International Journal of Refugee Law and is titled ‘Australia and the abortive Convention on Territorial Asylum: a case study of a cul de sac in international refugee and human rights law’. You can read it here.  

Dr. John Doyle has coauthored an article with Scott Doidge and Rhonda Siu titled ‘A Crisis of the Humanities? Reflections on the Role of the Humanities in the Global University.’ Published in Budhi: A journal of ideas and culture, you can read it here

Book review. 

Professor Phillip Deery recently reviewed Catherine Bond’s Law in War: Freedom and restriction in Australia during the Great War. Phillip’s review was published in The Age and Sydney Morning Herald. 

Working with web archives 

Most historians of the 1990s or beyond are going to have to come to grips with web archives. But the amount of data available, and the technical and legal barriers to use, make it difficult to know where to start. Over the last couple of months Associate Professor Tim Sherratt has been working with the British Library, the National Library of Australia, and the National Library of New Zealand to overcome some of these barriers by developing a set of tools and resources aimed at humanities researchers. These are now available through the GLAM Workbench.

For example, one of the features of the GLAM Workbench is the tools to help you find when a word or phrase appears (or disappears) from a web page, to compare the text content of a page over time, to create full page screenshots & more. If you want to go deeper, there’s detailed documentation and examples of the sorts of data that’s available from web archives and how you can get it. All of the resources are published as Jupyter notebooks which let you run live code in your browser. Just click on one of the links to get started. 

The development of these notebooks was supported by the International Internet Preservation Consortium’s Discretionary Funding Programme 2019-2020. 

In the media. 

Associate Professor Tony Joel was recently interviewed on the ABC. Tony discussed the tension between amateur and professional VFL, in reference to his bookOn the take: The 1910 scandal that changed Australian football forever. 

Grant for Vietnam War Learning and Teaching Resources

Earlier this year Deakin was successful in its tender for funding from the Victorian Department of Premier and Cabinet for the creation of learning and teaching resources on the Vietnam War. The resources are designed for Year 9 and 10 students and will complement the Vietnam Veteran speaking program, Learning Firsthand.  The team comprises Deakin historians and history education academics from the School of Education, including three Contemporary Histories members: Professor Peter Edwards, Dr. Bart Ziino and Dr. Rebecca Cairns, and will be led by Julianne Moss and Kerri Garrard. 

Since then Rebecca, Bart and Peter have continued working towards the development of the teaching and learning resources on the Vietnam War, published by the Department of Premier and Cabinet. It’s a great example of the potential for developing material co-designed by historians and history educators. The draft is about to go  out for consultation with teachers and stakeholders. The resource will be launched on Vietnam Veterans’ Day on 18 August and we will make the link available to CHRG when it is available.

 

FRIDAY 12TH JUNE 2020. 

 

A quick message from Professor David Lowe, Chair of CHRG. 

The CHRG newsletter resumes, so please send updates on developments of interest, knowing that readers expect a broad spectrum of different activities, to Jacqui Baker. I’m most grateful to Jacqui for assisting.

And related to this, the new CHRG website, currently in construction, will be able to showcase our work in more engaging ways than the existing one. It is being produced with support from the DVCR office. We are told that it is slightly delayed, but we should be live in early August. The site will be managed by a team of myself, Clare Corbould, Cassandra Atherton and Tony Joel, with Jacqui Baker.

David 

Publications. 

In April Professor Klaus Neumann published with Inside Story “Is illiberalism the force of the future?” You can read this fascinating article here

Dr. Geoffrey Robinson‘s article, “What is “Labor” about Labor State Governments in Australia”, has been published in the Australian Journal of Politics and History. This article has been coauthored with Rob Manwaring and is open access. You can find it here.  

Congratulations to Associate Professor Tony Joel and Mathew Turner on the recent publication of their book On the take: The 1910 scandal that changed Australian football forever. It is availablefor purchase here

Congratulations to Dr. Jason Gibson, who has had a number of works published so far this year including a book Ceremony Men: Making Ethnography and the Return of the Strehlow Collection, as well as two book chapters and a journal article.
–  Jason, Gibson. (2020) “Returning Recordings of Songs That Persist: The Anmatyerr Traditions of Akiw and Anmanty.” Edited by Linda Barwick, Jenny Green, and Petronell Vaarzon-Morel. Archival Returns : Central Australia and Beyond. Sydney: Sydney University Press, 2020. 
– Jason, Gibson, Shaun Angeles, and Joel Liddle. (2020) “Deciphering Arrernte Archives: The Intermingling of Textual and Living Knowledge.” Edited by Linda Barwick, Jenny Green, and Petronell Vaarzon-Morel. Archival Returns : Central Australia and Beyond. Sydney: Sydney University Press, 2020.
– Gibson, Jason. (2020) “Cultivating the Proletarian Outlook in District Seven.” Labour History, no. 118, pp. 55-81.

Dr Bart Ziino, with Anne-Marie Condé (National Archives of Australia), is guest editor of a special issue of Archives and Manuscripts, entitled Engaging with war records: Archival histories and historical practice’ (July 2020). The special issue emerges from the successful 2018 CHRG-sponsored conference ‘Recording, Narrating and Archiving the First World War’.  It features contributions from archivists and historians from Australia and internationally, including the eminent Michael Piggott. The publication enhances CHRG’s collective expertise and emerging strength in critical engagement with archives.  It follows Associate Professor Tiffany Shellam and Dr Joanna Cruickshank’s 2017 ‘Critical Archives’ conference and Associate Professor Helen Gardner’s ground-breaking work with Museum Victoria on the making and archiving of knowledge in the Howitt and Fison archive.

Dr. Rebecca Cairns‘ article “Deimperialising Asia-related history: An Australian case study” has recently been published in Curriculum and Pedagogy. This paper explores how the traditional points of reference for framing Asia – imperialism, colonialism, cold war structures, and the nation-state – continue to play a significant role in the way Asia is positioned in senior secondary history curriculum. Using Chen’s (2010) Asia as method framework it examines the potential of deimperialisation as an intervention for disrupting dominant curricular constructions of Asia. 

Book Reviews. 

Roy Hay has written an engaging and comprehensive review of Heather Reid and Marion Stell’s Women in boots: Football and feminism in the 1970s for The Footy Almanac. You can read it here

FRIDAY 27TH MARCH 2020. 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Dr John Doyle hosted a Q&A session with award-winning political historian Judith Brett about her latest book, From Secret Ballot to Democracy Sausage: How Australia Got Compulsory Voting, and her forthcoming Quarterly Essay on Australia’s addiction to coal, out in June.

Rod Gillet reviewed Roy Hay‘s recent book, Aboriginal people and Australian football in the nineteenth century: They did not come from nowhere, in ‘Time On,’ Annual Journal of the New South Wales Australian Football History Society, 2019, pp. 60-61. 

IN THE MEDIA.

Dr. Carolyn Holbrook was interviewed on The Dead Prussian Podcast. Holbrook, along with Prof. Keir Reeves, chatted about their book, The great war: Aftermath and commemoration. You can listen back to the podcast here

WRITING/CREATING SESSIONS. 

Due to government and institutional responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, professional historians are experiencing dramatic changes to how they work and socialise. As we learn to negotiate these challenges, there are other demands, such as mortgage repayments, food and utility costs, that require our professional lives to continue. In response, PhD Candidate Deb Lee Talbot has established a series of free Shut Up and Write/Create sessions online.
A core difference between this model and others in existence is that these is that these Shut Up and Write/Create sessions recognise we are now attempting to negotiate work from our households. These spaces may include housemates, parents, children, or a yodelling Border Collie dog. There is an understanding that some sessions maybe a little less structured than others. Also, these sessions are designed to warmly welcome individuals not just writing but creating, be it artwork, a musical score, choreography planning and so forth. 
To partake in the session you will need a link and password so please contact Deborah Lee-Talbot at colourfulhistories@gmail.com 

 

FRIDAY 20TH MARCH 2020.
IN THE MEDIA

Professor David Lowe features in a new Radio National Podcast: The Sands of Ooldea Collection. Professor Lowe’s contribution can be located in part 3 about Maralinga. There will also be an online article published by ABC news coming out later in the month which includes bonus material from the interview.

PUBLICATION NEWS

Professor Klaus Neumann, published with Inside Story, ‘In Defence of Europe‘, where he considers As the European Commission swings behind Greece, signs of an alternative Europe are emerging. Neumann also authored, ‘That Other Virus‘, where he considers, that despite Europe’s failure to rise to the challenge in Greece, the “virus of insolidarity” is still being resisted.

Honourary Fellow at Deakin University, Roy Hay, authored an article for Footy Almanac, When Coranderrk Won the Premiership: A Story. Also, Rod Gillett reviewed Hay’s recent book, Aboriginal People and Australian Football in the Nineteenth Century: They Did Not Come from Nowhere, in ‘Time On: Annual Journal of the New South Wales Australian Football History Society’, 2019, pp. 60–61.

Dr John Doyle hosted a Q&A session with award-winning political historian Judith Brett about her latest book, From Secret Ballot to Democracy Sausage: How Australia Got Compulsory Voting, and her forthcoming Quarterly Essay on Australia’s addiction to coal, out in June.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

2021 FELLOWSHIPS

Researchers: We Want You

Apply for a National Library Fellowship

The Library has diverse collections that support, inspire and transform research. Fellowships enable researchers to embark on a period of intensive research into the collections in a supportive, intellectual and creative environment.

Who should apply?

Fellowships are open to researchers from Australia and overseas undertaking advanced research projects. Eight funded fellowships will be awarded for research areas where the Library’s collections have the depth to support the desired outcomes.

What do Fellows receive?

·        an honorarium of AUD1,000 per week for 12 weeks

·        travel and accommodation support*

·        privileged access to the Library’s collections, staff and resources

·        uninterrupted time for research

Additional Honorary Fellowships may be awarded to support research and special access but without financial support.

Applications close Friday 24 April 2020 at 5pm (AEST)
Read the Fellowship guidelines and apply

The National Library of Australia is able to offer these fellowships thanks to generous philanthropic support from the Stokes Family; the Harold S. Williams Trust; the Ray Mathew and Eva Kollsman Trust; past and present members of the National Library Council and Patrons; and in memory of Averill Edwards.

*Conditions apply, see website for details

Please check the NLA website for the latest operating and program news. 

2020 SEMINAR SERIES

8 April

Presenter:  David Wetherell

Title: Liverpool plains, Hawkesbury River, City of Liverpool.

Abstract:

Apart from Queen Victoria no prominent Briton has left so deep an imprint on the Australian topography as Robert Banks Jenkinson Lord Liverpool. That he was one of Britain’s longest-serving Prime Ministers is well known. Virtually unknown is that he was part-Indian.

This paper discusses Robert’s Oxford background. Alongside his family and university is the career of his lifelong friend and junior political colleague Charles Wetherell, named in honour of his father.

Until the Age of Reform Liverpool is known for his signature on the Australian landscape; after the Age of Reform, he was dismissed as a mediocrity. The final few moments of the seminar discusses the radical parliamentary changes following his death. These led to the rise of what is now called ‘Whig history’ which dealt a blow not only to Robert’s reputation but meant obloquy, ridicule and political nemesis for his colleague Charles.   

Venue details will be provided closer to the presentation date.

Long table with multiple laptops open, paper work and workstations in view
Source: Marvin Meyer on Unsplash.

Friday 27 February 2020

PUBLICATION NEWS

CHRG member, Klaus Neumann, authored ‘Anatomy of a broken taboo’, and examined how an election in a tiny East German state has reverberated all the way to the top of the country’s politics for Inside Story. You can catch up on this short read here> https://insidestory.org.au/anatomy-of-a-broken-taboo/

EVENT NEWS

Australian Policy and History director, Carolyn Holbrook, was invited to participate in an international panel about history and policy at the recent American Historical Association conference in New York, with Dane Kennedy from the National History Center<http://www.nationalhistorycenter.org/> and Charles Kraus from the Wilson Center<https://www.wilsoncenter.org/> in Washington DC and Andrew Blick from History and Policy<http://www.historyandpolicy.org/> in London.

The panel discussed the increasing appetite for historical perspectives on major international issues such as climate change and declining trust in democracy. It also discussed the challenges of communicating historians’ work to policy makers and measuring their impact on public policy.

An extract from Carolyn’s presentation on 4 January 2020 is available here> https://aph.org.au/2020/02/aph-in-nyc/

ECR OPPORTUNITY!

We are delighted to announce the Contemporary Histories Research Group Award in Policy in History!

Designed to support Early Career Researchers recipients will receive:

$10,000 to fund archival research and other expenses, paid in instalments**

Mentoring by senior Deakin historians in the preparation of publications and access to institutional and staff support for DECRA/Alfred Deakin Post-Doctoral Fellowship applications

Use of Deakin library resources

Attendance with flight and accommodation expenses covered at the 2020 Australian Policy and History conference in Canberra

Recipients must produce:

A journal article relating to their research for submission to a highly ranked Australian or international journal with Deakin University affiliation on byline

An 800-word opinion piece for publication on the Australian Policy and History website

A presentation at the 2020 Australian Policy and History conference in Canberra

Applications are due on Thursday 12 March 2020 and must include:

A 1000-word project description, including detail of:

how the research will be undertaken (sources, archives, budget etc.)

how the research will inform an important issue of Australian public policy

CV

Supporting letter from PhD supervisor or senior academic

The awards commence on 14 April 2020 and conclude on 18 December 2020.

Email application documents to Dr Carolyn Holbrook by 11.59pm on Thursday 12 March 2020, carolyn.holbrook@deakin.edu.au

Selection Criteria

Project Quality 30%

Has the candidate outlined a coherent and rigorous project, with a well-defined research question and knowledge of historiography and principal themes?

Candidate 30%

Track record of the candidate as gauged by publication record and other factors including public engagement.

Feasibility 20%

Demonstrated timeline and budget for achievement of the project.

Benefit and Collaboration 20%

How does this research inform a pressing issue of public policy? What connections can the candidate demonstrate with relevant external stakeholders, e.g. public service?

* Early career researchers are defined as per ARC rules. They must have an award of PhD date on, or after 1 March 2017, or have an award of PhD date together with an allowable period of career interruptions that would be commensurate with an award of PhD date on, or after 1 March 2017. The allowable career interruptions set out and the period allowed for each are in Table 9 of the Grant Guidelines for the ARC Discovery Program (2019 edition).

° The awards are open only to ECRs without continuing positions.

**The award will be paid in instalments subject to the conditions of the award agreement. Applicants will be responsible for any tax liability which may arise from award of the grant. Recipients who are not employees of Deakin University must have an ABN in order to invoice Deakin University.

Further details are available at> https://aph.org.au/2020/02/chrg-award-in-history-and-policy/

2020 SEMINAR SERIES

Time/ Date: Wednesday 18 March 2020; 11 am to 12 pm.

Locations: Burwood Mtg Room C7.06; Geelong ic2.108; VMP ARTSED 2 36917.

Title: “The Weight of the Dead on the Living”: Identifying Fallen Soldiers 1914-18

Presenter: Sarah Ashbridge, University of Huddersfield

Abstract: This paper explores the development and introduction of British and Australian soldiers’ identity discs and their problematic use during the First World War.

With problems in the durability of discs and despite the introduction of the double identity disc in 1916, the number of unidentified bodies increased exponentially as the war progressed.  The inability to confirm the fate and location of so many men would reshape civilian cultures of grief and mourning, as national loss took priority over personal loss. The public needed answers. More specifically, the living needed answers. 

This paper will utilise archival reports, the letters of soldiers and items of material culture to explore the ‘weight of the dead on the living’ as a result of the failures of British identity discs used during the First World War. It will conclude with a number of archaeological case studies to demonstrate the difficulties with the identification of fallen soldiers in the field today, making recommendations for the improved recording of personal effects in order to assist future investigations to establish identity. 

Sarah Ashbridge is a PhD student in the History Department at the University of Huddersfield, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Heritage Consortium. She is co-supervised in the School of Archaeological and Forensic Sciences at the University of Bradford, from which university she received her MSc Forensic Archaeology and Crime Scene Investigation. Utilising an interdisciplinary methodology, Sarah’s doctoral research takes an anthropological approach to the history of British identity discs, also used by Australian soldiers during the First World War, situating their development within the broader history of the use identifying marks for the purpose of identifying fallen soldiers. Sarah is visiting Australia to work with Dianne Rutherford at the Australian War Memorial, completing investigative work to confirm or disprove the presence of asbestos in British and Australian identity discs, making recommendations for the storage and handling of identity discs in museums and archives today.

Friday 21 February 2020

 

In the media

 
CHRG member, Peter Edwards, took part in a Big Ideas program on Radio National, on ‘A history of popular protest in Australia’, together with Bob Brown, Verity Burgman and Pat Turner.
 
Popular protest movements have helped shift attitudes and shape Australia. Suffragettes pushed for the right of women to vote. Millions marched to demand an end to Vietnam War. Early gay and lesbian Mardi Gras marchers paved the way for LGBITQ rights. Today, Extinction Rebellion protesters are taking to the streets. What are the ingredients of a successful protest? Do rallies and radical activism, still get results?
 
Recorded at the National Museum of Australia on November 20, 2019. The program was first broadcast on 12 February and is available as an ABC podcast here.
Image credit: Malte Wingen

PhD Candidates- Publication and Scholarship Opportunities

The opportunity to publish your work in the Victorian Historical Journal, a peer-reviewed journal that publishes original work on the history of Victoria.

It is currently edited by the eminent scholars Richard Broome and Judith Smart, who are determined to give new and emerging scholars a real opportunity to publish in the field.

If you have any questions, please feel free to ask Dr. Bart Ziino, and see the flyer > RHSV-PostgradWriters-Flyer. 

 

 

 

 
Apply for the 2020 Summer Institute on Conducting Archival Research
The Wilson Center’s History and Public Policy Program and the Project on History and Strategy at CSIS seek applications for the 2020 Summer Institute on Conducting Archival Research (SICAR). Ph.D. candidates in various disciplines from the US and around the world are welcome to apply, with particular consideration for those who can demonstrate a policy-relevant historical research agenda. The deadline for applications is Sunday, March 8, 2020.
 
SICAR is a four-day seminar-style program co-hosted by the Wilson Center and CSIS in cooperation with George Washington’s Cold War Group. The objective is to provide Ph.D. students training from world-class faculty, researchers, archivists, policy practitioners, and publishers on conducting archival research and designing research agendas on topics broadly related to international history, national security, diplomacy and the military. Although archival research is an integral part of many academic disciplines, it is virtually never taught at the graduate level. To address this deficiency and provide PhD candidates with the tools they need to make the most of their access to historical archives, SICAR offers in-depth training, access to expert historians and practitioners, and familiarization with the intersection of history and policy in the heart of Washington, D.C.
 
Competitive candidates for the 2020 SICAR cohort are pursuing a Ph.D. topic in a variety of disciplines, including history, international relations, government, sociology, and public policy, as well as area and regional studies. Candidates should demonstrate an open mind about applying their research to contemporary policy and strategy questions. Preference will be given to students who have defended their dissertation proposal and who are about to embark on archival research.
 
The 2020 Seminar will be held during the week of May 26-May 29. Seminar sessions will take place at the Wilson Center and CSIS in downtown Washington, DC, followed by optional networking and sightseeing event programming. Student participants are required to attend all seminar sessions. (Exact schedule TBA).
 
The deadline for applications for the 2020 program is March 8, 2020. All materials must be received by 11:59 p.m. EST.
 
Applications should include the application cover sheet, curriculum vitae, and a one to two page (12 pt. font, double spaced, 1” margins) proposal outlining how your dissertation research would benefit from participation in SICAR. One letter of recommendation should also be submitted directly by the recommender. All application materials should be submitted via e-mail to sicar@wilsoncenter.org. The Wilson Center will make an effort to confirm receipt of all application materials.
 
The Wilson Center and CSIS will provide meals and hotel accommodations in Washington for non-local participants. Applicants are strongly encouraged to request additional funding for travel and ground expenses from their home institution or elsewhere.
 
For further information, please contact sicar@wilsoncenter.org, or read about past seminars here and here.

 

‘Urgent Histories’: AHA Annual Conference News

AHA/Copyright Agency Postgraduate Conference Bursaries Applications Are Now Open!

The Australian Historical Association in association with the Copyright Agency offers travel and writing bursaries linked to the AHA annual conference. The bursaries are intended to encourage and support emerging historians who would otherwise be unable to attend the conference.  Applications close 13 March 2020. More details are available here.

Jill Roe Early Career Researcher AHA Conference Scholarship Scheme Applications Are Now Open!

 
The second round of the Jill Roe Early Career Researcher AHA Conference Scholarship Scheme is now open. The scheme will support 5 Early Career Research historians to attend and present at the AHA annual conference. The scholarship, valued at $1000 per applicant, provides financial assistance for ECR applicants with little or no institutional support. The money is to be used towards assisting with registration costs, travel and accommodation.
 
Applications close 13 March 2020. More details are available here.
URGENT HISTORIES CONFERENCE UPDATE-
 

AHA/Honest History Conference 2020 Secondary School Teacher Scholarship Applications Are Now Open!

 
The AHA/Honest History: AHA Conference Teacher Scholarship supports a secondary school History teacher to attend the annual Australian Historical Association Conference to promote engagement between History teachers and the broader historical community. Funding for this scheme is made possible by a generous donation from Honest History which supports balanced and honest history writing in Australia. This is the final year of funding for this scholarship. The scholarship, valued at $400, provides financial assistance to facilitate attendance at the AHA annual conference. The money is to be used towards assisting with registration costs, travel, and accommodation. 
 
Applications are due 13 March 2020. Further information is available here.  
 

Friday 14 February 2020

New Member Welcome

CHRG welcomes its newest member, Dr. Christopher Mayes.

Dr Mayes is an Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow based in the Alfred Deakin Institute at Deakin University. Chris’s research interests include the history and philosophy of medicine, sociology of food, and political theory.  

Chris’s DECRA project is on the history of bioethics in Australia. This project aims to provide the first comprehensive account of the emergence of bioethics in Australia from the late-1970s. Using archival sources, oral histories, and theoretical analysis, this project examines the distinctive local and global contributions of Australian bioethics to regulatory frameworks, legal reform, and public discourse surrounding reproductive technologies, manipulation of embryonic life, and reconfiguration of the human subject.  

Chris’s first book, The Biopolitics of Lifestyle: Foucault, Ethics, and Health Choices  (Routledge, 2016), traced the transformation of the ways bodies, fat and health have been understood in Western societies leading to the emergence of obesity as a social, political and ethical problem.  

In addition to the history and philosophy of medicine, Chris has published on the history of agriculture in Australia, its role in dispossession of Indigenous peoples and its contemporary legacies in food politics and ethics. He is the author of Unsettling Food Politics: agriculture, dispossession and sovereignty in Australia (Rowman & Littlefield, 2018).  

Chris has contributed to The Conversation, ABC Religion & Ethics, and has been guest on a number of ABC RN programs and interviewed for Marie Claire. 

Publication News 

Christopher Mayes had an article published in the Journal of Intercultural Studies –Governmentality of Fencing in Australia. The article examines how the importation of wire fencing in the 1860s transformed pastoral practices and introduced new modes of governing biological life considered “pests”> https://www.tandfonline.com/…/abs/10.…/07256868.2020.1704228

ABSTRACT: The importation of wire-fencing to Australia from the 1840s transformed the management of sheep. Rather than shepherds watching over flocks, wire-fences allowed sheep to roam relatively unsupervised in paddocks. It is commonly argued that the popularity of wire-fenced paddocks arose because they reduced labor costs and improved wool production. This is partly true. The declining use of shepherds to protect flocks coincided with the ending of brutal frontier wars and localised eradication of dingoes. That is, the conditions for adopting wire fences and practice of paddocking were made possible through violence. Fences came to denote property, order, and civilization. Drawing on and expanding Michel Foucault’s work on pastoral power and governmentality, this paper argues that the initial period of colonial “pastoral violence” dovetailed into a “fencing governmentality” that mobilised literal and figurative “paddocks” to manage, sort, and reproduce life that is desirable while excluding life that is not. Importantly, violence does not vacate the paddock, but is recoded and manifest differently depending on one’s relation to the fences. This paper traces the development of a fencing governmentality and its use in the protection, exclusion and restriction of biological life, namely the lives of Aboriginals, animals, and non-British immigrants.

Congratulations!

To CHRG member and PhD candidate, Anna Kent. Anna was recently awarded the 2020 John Higley prize at the #ANZSANA2020 conference for her paper, ‘Scholarships as signposts- Australian government scholarship to the Pacific 2000-2010.

The Australian and New Zealand Studies Association of North America has established an annual Prize for the best paper presented by a graduate student at its Annual Conference. The Award is named in honor of John Higley, Emeritus Professor at the University of Texas at Austin, for his many contributions to Australian and New Zealand Studies. The winner will receive $500. Professor Higley taught in the Department of Sociology at UT-Austin from 1969 through 1974 before joining the Research School for Social Science at the Australian National University as a Fellow in Sociology. During that time, he led a major research project on Elites in Australia, a book that resulted. In 1984, Professor Higley returned to Austin, where he worked with Dr. Desley Deacon to establish the Edward A. Clark Center for Australian and New Zealand Studies. The Center was launched in 1988. Professor Higley served as its Director for 24 years, and held the Jack S. Blanton Chair in Australian Studies until his retirement in 2012. He advanced Australian and New Zealand Studies through his research on subjects that included immigration and trade policies as well as funding research by UT faculty and graduate students across a wide range of disciplines. A founding member of ANZSANA, as its president Professor Higley hosted two of the Association’s annual meetings at UT-Austin.

Credit: Benjamin Jones

‘Urgent Histories’: AHA Annual Conference News

Abstracts for the 2020 AHA conference are due on the 29 February 2020.

We are pleased to confirm that 7 affiliated associations will convene streams during the conference: the Australian and New Zealand Environmental History Network, the Institute for the Study of French-Australian Relations, the Religious History Association, the Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, the Australian Society for Sports History, the Society for the History of Children and Youth and the Australian Society for the Study of Labour History. Most of their calls for papers are now available and can be found below in the Calls for Papers and Reminders sections.

Details> https://www.deakin.edu.au/aha2020

BURSARY OPPORTUNITY

The Patrick Wolfe Early Career Researcher AHA Conference Bursary Applications Are Now Open

The 39th Australian Historical Association (AHA) Conference will be hosted by Deakin University Contemporary Histories Research Group on the theme ‘urgent histories’.

The Australian Historical Association is delighted to announce a new early career researcher bursary for attendance of the annual AHA Conference. The Patrick Wolfe Bursary will be awarded annually until 2028 to assist an early career researcher to participate in the AHA annual conference and attend the conference dinner. The prize honours the career of Dr Patrick Wolfe (1949-2016), an eminent historian and forerunner in the field of settler colonial studies. In 2016 when Patrick Wolfe died, we sadly lost one of the most original, committed, and generous historians of colonialism. Patrick’s intellectual influence was immense; he was read by historians, anthropologists, archaeologists, cultural theorists and Indigenous scholars the world over. He was a generous supervisor and mentor, never failing to celebrate his students’ achievements. Patrick was also a bon vivant and brilliant conversationalist, his friendship circle was immense. This award is designed to extend Patrick’s legacy and support an early career researcher to participate in the AHA Conference. The bursary will cover conference registration and attendance at the conference dinner.

Applications due 13 March 2020

Further information http://www.theaha.org.au/awards-and-prizes/patrick-wolfe-early-career-researcher-conference-bursary/

Friday, 7 February 2020

Publication news 

Congratulations to Professor David Lowe and Associate Professor Tony Joel who, as editors, recently saw the publication of the eighth volume in the Remembering the Modern World series, Remembering Asia’s World War Two.

Carla Pascoe Leahy has just published an edited collection with Petra Bueskens entitled Australian Mothering: Historical and Sociological Perspectives (Palgrave, 2020). This interdisciplinary collection of 22 chapters from eminent and emerging scholars defines the field of Australian maternal studies for the first time. Carla also published an article on changes to parenthood and childhood in the Conversation followed by an interview on ABC radio’s national summer drive program.
 

Professor Klaus Neumann has written about Australian, New Zealand, Pacific Islands and German cultures and pasts, memories and histories. Professor Neumann’s latest publication is How Australia’s love affair with coal looks from afar, and why it matters

In the Media

 
‘As a historian, I’ve had to think much more deeply about who tells our histories.’
 
Researchers Dr Joanna Cruickshank, Dr Carolyn Holbrook and Dr Jon Ritchie were recently featured in disruptr. Here they shared insights into little-known histories like Coranderrk, ANZAC legend and Papua New Guinea’s World War 2 experiences.
 
Read more at > https://disruptr.deakin.edu.au/society/from-past-to-present-and-back-again/ 
 
 

Member welcome

The CHRG welcomes their latest member, Dr Gwyn McClelland. Dr McClelland holds a Master of Divinity from the University of Divinity, Melbourne, Australia and a Doctorate of Philosophy in Japanese history from Monash University. In 2020 he will teach in the Deakin University unit, “Conflict and its Legacies in Modern Asia”. Gwyn was a secondary teacher of Japanese and Geography for some twenty years and while doing his PhD at Monash he taught in Education (Bilingualism and Languages Methodology), History and the Japanese language. In 2019 he coordinated a modern Chinese history unit at Monash University, ‘The Fall and Rise of Modern China’. Gwyn is the winner of the 2019 John Legge prize for best thesis in Asian Studies, awarded by the Asian Studies Association of Australia (ASAA). Gwyn has taught at Monash, RMIT and Melbourne Universities and he has participated in recent workshops at Copenhagen University (Center for Contemporary Buddhist Studies) and the University of California, Berkeley. His monograph, based on his work interviewing Catholic survivors of the Nagasaki atomic bombing was published in 2019 by Routledge in Mark Selden’s series, “Asia’s Transformations” and is entitled ‘Dangerous Memory in Nagasaki: Prayers, Protests and Catholic Survivor Narratives’.

Gwyn McClelland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday, 24 January 2020

Publication news

Chair in Contemporary History in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Professor David Lowe, recently authored ‘Applied History Today’ in the new Journal of Applied History You can access this material here (https://brill.com/view/journals/joah/aop/issue.xml) or check with Deakin Library

PhD candidate Autumn Royal is the founding editor of the Disclaimer online journal. Academic in scope and dedicated to documenting various and diverse perspectives regarding sound and listening practices this journal documents past and present accounts of sound and listening practices. A link to the journal can be found here: https://disclaimer.org.au/

Call for papers

‘Urgent Histories’: Australian Historical Association 2020 Conference CFP; 29 June-3 July 2020, Deakin University Geelong Waterfront Campus

The need to interrogate the past is today more pressing than ever. Historians are now both scholars and actors in the face of worldwide political efforts to realign the past to fit present imperatives. This conference calls us to consider the place of history in current political discourses. Embracing the contestability of explanatory stories, different theoretical and methodological vantage points, ‘Urgent Histories’ invites historians to focus on how the past is used in contemporary public debates, disputes and narratives. The convenors welcome proposals for papers, panels and roundtables on any geographical area, time‐period, or field of history, especially those relating to the theme of urgent histories.

Abstracts due 29 February 2020.

Further details are available here>https://www.deakin.edu.au/aha2020

In the media

During the last two weeks of December and the first two weeks of January, PhD Candidate Jacqui Baker presented a program called Making Waves; a summer fill-in program on 3RRR all about women’s and feminist history. Jacqui chatted to a number of researchers about their passion for women’s and feminist history, including PhD Candidate Deb Lee-Talbot. You can listen back to the first, third and fourth weeks to hear interviews about research into feminist frontiers and Evangelical sites, early animal rights campaigner Frances Levvy, historical fiction about Welsh leader Owain Glyndwr’s wife Marged, Australia’s Women’s Liberation Movement examined in a global context, and women journalists and the media landscape in the United States in the 1970s. Listen back to the second week to hear some of the music of the Women’s Liberation Movement. 

Details> https://www.rrr.org.au/explore/programs/making-waves 

Image credit: Malte Wingen