Newsletter

Friday, 10 October 2019

Awards-

The Contemporary Histories Research group is pleased to announce Deakin Staff member, Dr. Bart Ziino, recently won the Best Article Award for the 2018 article “‘They Seem to Understand all about the War’: Australian children and the First World War,” which appeared in the Journal of The History of Childhood and Youth  2018.

Linda Mahood, JHCY Editor, and Tamara Myers, SHCY President, advised that the committee considered Ziino’s article outstanding for his ‘complex use of a unique range of child and adult produced sources which enables readers to more fully understand child and adult perspectives on war. Ziino’s documentation includes children’s private writing, play and memoirs, and parents and teachers reflections and correspondence on turbulent family life and children’s behaviour. This erudite technique probes the meeting-points between adult attempts to influence children’s patriotism and children’s own experiences of lost in wartime. It is a methodology that might be effective in other studies of how children negotiate growing up in times of social stress, unrest and turmoil.’

Using your Deakin login, you can access the article here.

Publication news-

CHRG member and Deakin staff, Associate Professor Helen Gardener, has written the first article published in our new series Postcards from Papua New Guinea. Inspired by her recent travels to PNG, Gardner gifts readers with a detailed and engaging account of what it was like to attend the 44th Independence Day

Associate member of the Contemporary Histories Research Group, Dr. Philipp Strobl has published in the Migrant Knowledge blog of the German Historical Institute in Washington ‘Migrant Biographies as a Prism for Explaining Transnational Knowledge Transfers’. This article is a theoretical comment about how to rethink and combine the history of migration and the history of knowledge.

 

In the Media-

Contemporary Histories Research Group Associate Roy Hay was in at SBS a week or so ago to talk about Rudi Gutendorf who coached the Socceroos in the early 1980s. After recording this podcast for Christian Froelicher’s German language podcast Roy was asked ‘where did the Socceroos get their name?’

The result is another podcast which is now up on the SBS website at:

[English] https://www.sbs.com.au/…/what-are-the-origins-of-the-nickna…

[German] https://www.facebook.com/SBSGerman/posts/2621396464579110 

Events- 

Ailsa du Bois presenting her research at the inaugural Talking History @ Eureka series
‘Talking History @ Eureka’ . Source: Ailsa du Bois, 2019

 

Masters Candidate, Ailsa Brackley du Bois, presented on 3 September, as the inaugural guest speaker launching the ‘Talking History @ Eureka’ series, at the Eureka Centre, Ballarat East, Victoria. The title of her paper was ‘Popular Theatrical Entertainment, Eureka, 1854.’​

 

 

The annual Australian Short Story Festival is back this October and for the first time it is being held in Melbourne! From the 18th-20th of October at the Hawthorn Arts Festival, you can join a number of great authors as they discuss short forms of writing, including short stories, comics and essays. You can also take advantage of writing workshops with the likes of Maria Tumarkin, author of the multi-award-winning Traumascapes and Axiomatic. Deakin University’s Associate Professor Maria Takolander will also appear on a panel alongside Maria Tumarkin. Grab your tickets now at: australianshortstoryfestival.com/tickets 

Associates news-

The recent HDR Workshop, Beyond the Academy, provided Deakin University – Arts and Education History Ph.D.candidates and Honours students with the opportunity to speak with members of the Professional Historians Association (Vic & Tas).
 
It was a fascinating conversation as the PHA (Vic&Tas) is a dynamic community of professional historians passionate about communicating the past to the general public.
 
Their members work in a variety of areas from museums and education, to public policy and academia.
 
With a new Mentoring Scheme on the horizon, now is the perfect time for HDRs to join a supportive and growing community of history professionals, and get access to events, professional development and career support as you consider – what’s next?
 
Find out more (including events available to non-members) via Twitter, Facebook and their website.
 
They look forward to hearing from you!
 

Friday, 4 October 2019

Publication news-

Deakin staff and CHRG member, Dr Carolyn Holbrook, and Professor Keir Reeves’ (eds.) book ‘The Great War: Aftermath and Commemoration’ will be launched by Professor Christina Twomey on Thursday 11 November 2019, Warehouse Clunes Library, Fraser Street, Clunes.

Book details are located here.

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CHRG Associate, Roy Hay, will have his book ‘Aboriginal People and Australian football in the nineteenth century‘ issued as a paperback. One stockist will be Readings.

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CHRG member Klaus Neumann published a chapter, “In search of ‘Australia and the Australian people’: The National Library of Australia and the representation of cultural and linguistic diversity” in Remembering Migration: Oral Histories and Heritage in Australia, eds. Kate Darian-Smith and Paula Hamilton, 285-299.

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PhD candidate Jacqui Barker attended the Forced Migrations Forum, at Deakin Downtown (18 September 2019). Jacqui’s provided an insightful account for those of us that were unable to attend. 

Call for Papers-

Call for papers information

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reminders- workshop #4 registrations close 7 October

Deakin- HDR Workshop #4: Ethical History

Are you doing “good” or “bad” history? Are you using human data? How are you going to store your data? Unsure as how to answer these questions? Then come along to our Ethical History workshop! This two hour intensive workshop is designed to provide HDR students with the foundations to negotiate the particular ethical considerations that need to be made for their projects. 

First, Jon Ritchie (Deakin University) will draw on his experiences of field work and speak to the ethics of undertaking oral history work. Particularly interested in finding the Papua New Guinean ‘voice’ in the wider discussion of relations with Australia and the region, colonialism and post-colonialism, the nation and its challengers, Jon engaged in a number of research projects employing oral history methodologies, under the broad overall heading ‘War, Independence, and Leadership in Papua New Guinea’. 

During the following hour, Bart Ziino (Deakin University) will discuss the ethical requirements of historical research, with particular reference to the revised National Statement on  Ethical Conduct in Human Research (2018). Bart’s ethics experience has, in part, been informed by his project The Culture of War: Private Sentiment in Australia 1914-18- a study of private sentiment in Australia during the First World War, the impact of family history on remembering war, and the commemoration of Australia’s wars on sites abroad.

A Q and A will offer students and graduates the opportunity to draw on the experiences of Dr Ritchie and Dr Ziino to begin applying information from the workshop to their current research project.

Friday, 26 September 2019

Call for Papers- 

Two pages of a call for papers for the Children and Nation 2020 Conference

 

 

Publication News-  

Robert Kenny, CHRG Associate, review of Élisabeth Roudinesco’s, Freud in His Time and Ours was published in the latest issue of the history of science journal Isis, Vol. 110, No. 3: 629-630. 

 

CHRG member, Heather Brown, had an article published in Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal: ‘Postfeminist Re-essentialism in The Hunger Games and The Selection Trilogies’. You can access the article here>> https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/372IQFGWBFEX42RGQJVA/full?target=10.1080/00497878.2019.1665044

 

Ph.D. candidate, Deb Lee-Talbot recently presented a sample from her thesis, A Feminist Frontier?, at the Doing Feminist History Symposium, University of Technology (Sydney).

A brief account of her experience is here. 

 

REMINDER- WORKSHOP #4 REGISTRATIONS CLOSE 7 OCTOBER

 

Deakin’s HDR History students are invited to attend a series of four workshops.

These workshops have been designed to address issues that students identify as important: how to start writing thesis chapters, how to write History for a range of publications, where to gain professional employment and undertaking ethical work as a Historian.

Deakin- HDR Workshop #4: Ethical History

Are you doing “good” or “bad” history? Are you using human data? How are you going to store your data? Unsure as how to answer these questions? Then come along to our Ethical History workshop! This two hour intensive workshop is designed to provide HDR students with the foundations to negotiate the particular ethical considerations that need to be made for their projects. 

First, Jon Ritchie (Deakin University) will draw on his experiences of field work and speak to the ethics of undertaking oral history work. Particularly interested in finding the Papua New Guinean ‘voice’ in the wider discussion of relations with Australia and the region, colonialism and post-colonialism, the nation and its challengers, Jon engaged in a number of research projects employing oral history methodologies, under the broad overall heading ‘War, Independence, and Leadership in Papua New Guinea’. 

During the following hour, Bart Ziino (Deakin University) will discuss the ethical requirements of historical research, with particular reference to the revised National Statement on  Ethical Conduct in Human Research (2018). Bart’s ethics experience has, in part, been informed by his project The Culture of War: Private Sentiment in Australia 1914-18- a study of private sentiment in Australia during the First World War, the impact of family history on remembering war, and the commemoration of Australia’s wars on sites abroad.

A Q and A will offer students and graduates the opportunity to draw on the experiences of Jon and Bart to begin applying information from the workshop to their current research project.

Friday, 13 September 2019

In the media-

Illustrated image of "The Old Lie" bookcoverCalls for the Australian War Memorial to commemorate frontier conflicts including massacres have not yet transformed the galleries of the Canberra institution. Rather, AWM director Brendan Nelson has made an evasive statement about colonial conflicts being between British and Indigenous people, rather than between Australians and Indigenous people. The AWM has instead, in very recent years, emphasised Indigenous service during overseas military engagements or at home during world wars—including in 2019 new work in the memorial’s Sculpture Garden.

In her second novel, The Old Lie (Hachette) Noongar writer Claire G Coleman takes on the histories—and long forgetting—of Australian Indigenous people’s military service. In an intergalactic sci-fi extravaganza, Coleman combines those stories with themes of colonial-era violence, dispossession, and contemporary regimes of racialized nation-making and citizenship. The result is a true page-turner with a cracking finale.

CHRG member Clare Corbould recently discussed the novel on ABC Radio National show, The Book Shelf, hosted by Kate Evans and Cassie McCullagh. The episode is available to stream here, or download via your favourite podcast service.

Publication News-  

Dr Donna-Lee Frieze, Genocide Studies Scholar and CHRG member attended the International Association of Genocide Scholars (IAGS) in July. To give you a sense of the importance of this occasion, Donna wrote a blog piece that is available here.

Honorary Associate of CHRG, Dr Robert Kenny, reviewed Élisabeth Roudinesco’s, Freud in His Time and Ours in the latest issue of the history of science journal Isis, Vol. 110, No. 3: 629-630. 

Event News- 

On Thursday 26 September, 12 pm to 1 pm, Ph.D. candidate, Deb Lee-Talbot will present Papua’s First ‘Prime Minister’ and the ‘Queen of New Guineans’- how feminist discourse functioned within the London Missionary Society spaces in Papua, from 1874 to 1898. This seminar examines whether feminist discourse functioned within the London Missionary Society spaces in Papua, from 1872 to 1898. It also considers the ways in which contemporary historians approach issues of gender. Seminar details are located here. 

Friday, 6 September 2019

Publication News-  

Shows the archive of a folder series
Source: Photo by Mr Cup / Fabien Barral on Unsplash

 

CHRG member and Ph.D. candidate Anna Kent has just jetted back across the Pacific after three weeks in Fiji, mostly at the National Archives of Fiji.

To read an account of her experiences, and how her thesis has changed due to this journey, follow this link> https://blogs.deakin.edu.au/conte…/fiji-fieldwork-anna-kent/

Event News- 

Deakin staff and CHRG member, Dr. Carolyn Holbrook, is delivering a seminar next Tuesday 10 September, 1-2pm at the Centre for Comparative Constitutional Studies, Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne, details below.

Failure to Attach: Australians and Their Federation

 

Scholars have disagreed about the degree of sentiment that propelled the creation of the Commonwealth of Australia in 1901. Was Federation a cynical deal designed to further the economic interests of the wealthy and privileged, at the expense of the working classes, women, Indigneous people and other non-white Australians? Or was it the achievement of idealistic founders who were pursuing a sacred ideal of nationhood, as John Hirst argued in The Sentimental Nation? This article examines the nature of early debates about commemoration of the anniversary of Federation to gain insight into the nature of the compact. The article shows that the lack of sentimental attachment to the Federation is evident in widespread indifference towards its anniversary from the very earliest years after 1901. It suggests that Australians’ longstanding resistance to reform of the Federation is linked to their historic lack of attachment to it.

 

Appointment News- 

Visiting Professor in Australian Studies 2020-21 or 2021-22 (two terms)

Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Centre for Pacific and American Studies, The University of Tokyo

 The Visiting Professorship in Australian Studies was created in 1999 by the Centre for Pacific and American Studies, The University of Tokyo, to promote a deeper understanding of Australia and its regional engagement. The position is supported by the Australia-Japan Foundation.

 Applications are invited from highly qualified Australians with significant academic or public achievement in the fields of Australian studies, history, cultural studies, politics, literary studies, international relations and other relevant areas across the humanities and social sciences. The Visiting Professor in Australian Studies is required to teach at undergraduate and graduate levels; to present conference papers; to conduct research; and to participate in promoting Australian Studies within Japan.

The appointment is for a period of approximately 10 months and will commence early September 2020 or early September 2021. Applicants may be considered for either term or both terms. The Visiting Professor is expected to spend most of the period in Tokyo engaged in research and, during semester, in teaching. All teaching is conducted in English. An attractive salary package and subsidised accommodation are available.

 Applications close at 5pm on 18 October 2019.

The selection process is managed by Professor Kate Darian-Smith on behalf of the International Studies Association (InASA).

A full position description and application procedures are available at: https://inasa.org/blog/visiting-professor-in-australian-studies-university-of-tokyo/

For any further information contact: Professor Kate Darian-Smith email: kate.dariansmith@utas.edu.au

Event reminders

At the next CHRG Seminar, Thursday 12 September, 11am to 12 pm,  Deakin staff member, Associate Professor Gabby Wolf, will present Machinations of the British Medical Association: Excluding Refugee Doctors from Queensland’s Medical Profession, 1937-42.

Abstract- When medical practitioners fled from the Nazi regime in the 1930s, the British Medical Association (BMA), the peak body for the medical profession in the British Empire, agitated strenuously to prevent ‘refugee doctors’, as they were described, from practising medicine throughout the Empire. Prominent BMA representatives pursued this agenda in Australia through their appointment to statutory state-based authorities that registered and regulated doctors. This paper discusses how, between 1937 and 1942, they sought to use those bodies’ registration and disciplinary powers in Queensland to exclude refugee doctors, despite the resistance of this state’s government to BMA pressure to pass legislation constricting their eligibility for registration. In so doing, the paper contributes new perspectives to scholarship that analyses the BMA’s effectiveness as a pressure group. This paper’s exploration of motives for the BMA’s animosity towards refugee doctors builds, too, on histories of the medical profession.

Time/ Location- Burwood F2.009; Geelong ic 2.108; VMP ArtsEd1

REMINDER- FORCED MIGRATIONS FORUM REGISTRATIONS CLOSE 13 SEPTEMBER


During this event Klaus Neumann, Carolyn Holbrook and Amy Nethery consider the treatment of asylum seekers. After the panel speaks there will be a brief Q and A session. It will be held on 18 September, at Deakin Downtown, 5 pm to 6.30 pm. Register at Eventbrite or RSVP directly to Deb Lee-Talbot at artsed-contemp-histories@deakin.edu.au by 5pm AEST 13 September.

 

Friday, 30 August 2019

Event News- 

 

PhD candidate Fiona Gatt is speaking on Tuesday 3 September, 1:45 – 4pm, at the University of the Third Age (U3A) Waverley Navy & Military Group, 94 Batesford Rd, Chadstone. She will talk to the group about how a family history approach to studying the Great War can reframe the war as an event in lives already being lived. This reveals the people who experienced the war, rather than the war experienced by the people and is particularly significant to repatriation studies. 

REMINDER- WORKSHOP #2 REGISTRATIONS CLOSE 4 SEPTEMBER

 

Deakin’s HDR History students are invited to attend a series of four workshops.

These workshops have been designed to address issues that students identify as important: how to start writing thesis chapters, how to write History for a range of publications, where to gain professional employment and undertaking ethical work as a Historian.

Deakin- HDR workshop #2: The craft of writing true stories.

‘Historical thinking is unnatural’, declared Sam Wineberg, in his book 2001 book Historical Thinking and other unnatural acts (Temple Press). In this workshop we unpack what Wineberg was suggesting, and explore notions around the practice of historical thinking, the role of imagination in history and the crafting of stories. Drawing on historians who reflect on their writing process, we focus on writing history (that people want to read), engaging with our imagined readers and the language, metaphors and prose we use to find our own voice. Be prepared to pick up your pen/laptop and craft some true stories in this workshop.

Recruiting participants for a study on student experiences of senior secondary history

My area of research is history education in schools. I am currently seeking to recruit undergraduate participants for a study on the student experience of history in senior secondary school, looking at Asia-related history more specifically. We have already interviewed a number of Deakin undergraduate students who studied History or Languages in senior secondary schools but we would really like to speak with students who identify as having Asian heritage. Participants do not need to be currently studying history at university.

My colleague, Michiko Weinmann, and I would be very appreciative if you could promote the attached flyer to your current students.

Thanks,

Dr Rebecca Cairns r.cairns@deakin.edu.au

Friday, 23 August 2019

Publication News

A chapter written by CHRG Associate, Associate Professor Tim Sherratt, based on his keynote at the Association of Digital Humanities Organisations’ annual conference in 2015, has been published in Debates in Digital Humanities 2019. ‘Unremembering the forgotten’, in Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019, Matthew K Gold and Lauren F Klein (eds), University of Minnesota Press, 2019 is freely available online here. 
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CHRG member Professor Klaus Neumann, with Savitri Taylor, recently published ‘He has to take his chances’: the resettlement of a refugee in Australia and his deportation to the country he had fled, 1980–1992, History Australia. You can access this article here

Abstract:

Drawing on previously unexamined archival records, this article explores the Australian government’s attempts to deport a Cuban national who had been resettled in Australia as a refugee in 1980, in 1987 was sentenced to two years in prison on assault charges, and in 1991 was left stranded at Singapore Airport because Cuba refused to facilitate his repatriation. Before the Singaporean government enforced his return to Australia, Parliament passed the Migration Amendment Bill 1991, which had been amended specifically to ensure his indefinite detention upon his arrival. Highlighting the government’s determination to proceed with the deportation, the article explores the political and legal circumstances of the case, and discusses it in light of recent changes to the Migration Act.

REMINDER- WORKSHOP #1 REGISTRATIONS CLOSE 28 AUGUST

Deakin’s HDR History students are invited to attend a series of four workshops.

These workshops have been designed to address issues that students identify as important: how to start writing thesis chapters, how to write History for a range of publications, where to gain professional employment and undertaking ethical work as a Historian.

Deakin HDR workshop #1: Genres for History

The writing of history comes in many forms. As HDR historians writing on your thesis, you might not be focused on the different genres of writing that historians engage in. In this workshop we explore different forms, highlighting the styles of the essay, the book chapter, the journal article and the book, and identifying changing target readers, understanding specific writing goals and academic or public outcomes. This workshop will be enhanced by workshop #2: the craft of writing true stories. Register here.

 

Friday, 16 August 2019.

Event News-

CHRG member, and Deakin staff, Dr. Carolyn Holbrook is doing this keynote lecture on ‘Praying for Peace, Preparing for War: Anzac Commemoration in the 1930s’ at the UNSW@ADFA ‘Towards a New History of the Interwar period’

 

Details here.  

on a blue body of water orange sculptures in the shape of people float half submurged holding onto black car tires
Photo by James Beheshti on Unsplash

The Contemporary Histories Research Group invites you to attend this special forum- Forced migrations. During this event Klaus Neumann, Carolyn Holbrook and Amy Nethery consider the treatment of asylum seekers. After the panel speaks there will be a brief Q and A session. It will be held on 18 September, at Deakin Downtown, 5 pm to 6.30 pm. Register at Eventbrite or RSVP directly to Deb Lee-Talbot at artsed-contemp-histories@deakin.edu.au by 5pm AEST 13 September.

Klaus Neumann

‘Refugee “Crises” and the Successes of Right-Wing Populists’

In his talk, Professor Klaus Neumann will explore the question of whether irregular migrants from the global south have been responsible for the rise of right-wing demagogues such as Donald Trump, Tony Abbott and Matteo Salvini and of right-wing political parties such as Germany’s AfD (Alternative for Germany) in the global north.
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Klaus Neumann is writing a book about German public and policy responses to asylum seekers and refugees. He is the author of numerous articles and books in a wide range of fields, including (post)colonial history, social memory, historical justice and immigration. His most recent books are Historical Justice and Memory (co-edited with Janna Thompson) and Across the Seas, winner of the 2016 CHASS Australia Prize for non-fiction. He works for the Hamburg Foundation for the Advancement of Research and Culture, and is an honorary professor at Deakin University.

Carolyn Holbrook

‘The Malaysia Solution: A Case Study in Policy Failure’

One of the key explanations for the difficulty in resolving significant public policy issues in the last decade is the breakdown of tried and tested policy-making processes. Policy-making has been politicised and become piecemeal and reactive, so this argument goes. Further, the policy expertise of the public service has been diminished, and whatever remains of its capacity is not being utilised to advantage. This paper tests these arguments about the policy making process in the case of a significant policy issue; the treatment of asylum seekers to Australia. Using interviews with key players, it traces the development of the Rudd/Gillard/Rudd Labor government’s asylum seeker policy between 2007 and 2013 and identifies the reasons it became so controversial and ineffective. From this case study, Carolyn will draw some broader conclusions about the causes of policy-making paralysis in recent Australian political history. You can contact Carolyn on Twitter: @sigmundmarx

Dr Carolyn Holbrook is an Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow, working on a cultural history of Australians’ attitudes towards their federation and democratic institutions. Her other major project is a collaboration with Professor James Walter at Monash University about the history of Australian public policy since the 1940s, with a particular focus on indigenous, refugee, housing and employment policies. Carolyn’s book about the history of how Australians have remembered the First World War, Anzac: The Unauthorised Biography, was published in 2014, and her co-edited collection with Keir Reeves, The Great War: Aftermath and Commemoration, will be published by UNSW Press in November 2019.

Amy Nethery

‘Administrative incarceration in Australia: a carceral history’

Immigration detention is often misunderstood as a government policy that began in the early 1990s. Yet, as a form of administrative detention, it is better understood as the most recent iteration of a form of incarceration with a much longer history. This article examines three institutional predecessors to immigration detention in Australia: Aboriginal reserves, quarantine stations, and enemy alien internment camps. Viewed together, these forms of administrative detention form an almost continuous history of government practice from the 1830s. A survey of these institutions reveals how they were implemented to respond to ideas and anxieties about Australia’s national identity. There are striking similarities in the types of people chosen for incarceration, the methods deployed to address social anxieties, and the nature of the resulting incarceration. All forms of administrative detention were characterised by executive control and lack of transparency, accountability, and the rule of law. By drawing the links between these seemingly disparate forms of administrative detention and their role in shaping settler colonial Australia, we can better understand modern day immigration detention as a continuation of that history.

Dr Amy Nethery is a senior lecturer in politics and policy studies at Deakin University. She  researches  the development  and  impact  of  asylum  policies  in  Australia  and  Asia,  with  a  focus  on transnational  cooperation  on  border  control.  An important theme of her work is the analysis of asylum policy according to democratic norms of policymaking. She  has  a  particular  interest  in  immigration  detention:  its  history,  evolution,  diffusion, legal  status,  consistency with democratic norms, and  human  impact. 

 

 

REMINDER-

You’re invited to attend a Contemporary Histories Research Group seminar scheduled for Wednesday, 21 August, from 12pm to 1 pm.

This session, Women and Community on the Upper Goulburn Goldfields: reframing a completed PhD., will be presented by guest presenter Louise Blake. 

Further details are available here> CHRG Seminar Series 

Friday, 9 August 2019.

Publication News

Tiffany Shellam and Jo Cruickshank have guest edited the latest issue of the Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History on ‘Critical Archives’. The special issue is an outcome from the 2017 conference titled ‘Critical Archives: New practices, new interpretations and new lives for archival materials’, held at Deakin University and funded by CHRG and ADI. This issue includes papers by Deakin academics Dr Billy Griffiths, Dr Tiffany Shellam and Dr Amanda Lourie (with her colleagues from Native Title Services), Professor Tony Ballantyne (Otago University) and Dr Clint Bracknell (Edith Cowan University).

You can access the journal here.

 

Event News- 

<img class=” wp-image-5734″ src=”https://blogs.deakin.edu.au/contemporary-history-studies/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2019/08/Sylvester-Johnson.jpg” alt=”Sylvester Johnson, Professor and Director of the Center for Humanities Source: College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences” wi