Dr Jason Taliadoros

TALIADOROS, J profile picDr Jason Taliadoros is a Senior Lecturer at the Deakin Law School.

Jason holds undergraduate degrees in law, arts, and history (with honours), as well as a PhD from the University of Melbourne. More recently Jason was awarded a Graduate Certificate of Higher Education from Deakin University.

Prior to joining the Deakin School of Law in 2011, Jason held a three-year ARC postdoctoral research fellowship at Monash University in history during which time he was a sessional tutor and lecturer in the Faculty of Law at Monash University. He has held fellowships from the Convivium Interdisciplinary Centre at Siena College (USA) in 2004-2005, and was a visitor to the Stephan Kuttner Institute for Medieval Canon Law in Munich in 2010 and 2014.

Jason practiced as a solicitor in insurance litigation with Herbert Geer & Rundle (as it then was) in commercial litigation, with other commercial law firms, and as a paralegal. Jason also worked as an in-house solicitor with Monash University.

Jason has a developed profile in researching the history of legal ideas in their historical and religious contexts, particularly the European High Middle Ages of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. He has authored articles in these areas for journals such as the Cleveland State Law Review, Haskins Society Journal, Zeitschrift der Savigny-Stiftung für Rechtsgeschichte-Kanonistische Abteilung, Sortuz (Oñati Journal of Emergent Socio-legal Studies), and the Journal of Religious History; he has also written book chapters on these topics in the Europa and Disputatio Brepols series. His book, Law and Theology in Twelfth-Century England (Brepols, 2006) re-appraised the role of law as a discipline that merged and intersected with theology, through a systematic study of the works of one of England’s most influential canon and Roman lawyers of the twelfth century. His ARC-funded research project centred on tracing antecedents of modern conceptions of ‘human rights’ in the works of twelfth-century canon lawyers and ecclesiastical writers.