2020 Seminar Series

Sessions run on Wednesdays, 11 am to 12 pm (AEST). 

Please comment below if you wish to attend. The CHRG Academic Coordinator will be in touch shortly, to advise you on how to access a particular presentation. 

Trimester 1

8 April

Presenter:  David Wetherell

Title: Liverpool plains, Hawkesbury River, City of Liverpool.

Abstract:

Apart from Queen Victoria no prominent Briton has left so deep an imprint on the Australian topography as Robert Banks Jenkinson Lord Liverpool. That he was one of Britain’s longest-serving Prime Ministers is well known. Virtually unknown is that he was part-Indian.

This paper discusses Robert’s Oxford background. Alongside his family and university is the career of his lifelong friend and junior political colleague Charles Wetherell, named in honour of his father.

Until the Age of Reform Liverpool is known for his signature on the Australian landscape; after the Age of Reform, he was dismissed as a mediocrity. The final few moments of the seminar discusses the radical parliamentary changes following his death. These led to the rise of what is now called ‘Whig history’ which dealt a blow not only to Robert’s reputation but meant obloquy, ridicule and political nemesis for his colleague Charles.   

Where?  Burwood C7.06; Waurn Ponds ic2.108; VMP VMP ARTSED 2 36917

22 April

Presenter:  Dr Alexandra Roginski

Title:  forthcoming

Abstract:  forthcoming 

Where?  Burwood C7.06; Waurn Ponds ic2.108; VMP VMP ARTSED 2 36917

29 April

Presenter: Marama Whyte

Title: Forthcoming

Abstract: Forthcoming

6 May

Presenter:  Associate Professor Helen Gardner

Title:  Race Kinship and the Branching Tree: a colonial perspective

Abstract:  Europeans undertaking the study of ‘primitive’ kinship in the nineteenth century sought to represent local distinctions in kinship forms within global metaphors of human development.   The most common motif of the evolutionism of kinship was a single line or ladder of kinship ‘advance’ along a path predetermined by theories of European prehistory and global human progress.  When evolutionism was challenged, most famously by Franz Boas but also by Australian settler-colonial practitioners, the ladder of human development was replaced by the branching tree as the motif of human change through time.  This paper will explore the diagrammatics of kinship representation in Australia with three aims: first to explore Aboriginal input into the process, second to examine the broader implications for settler Indigenous relations and the place of Indigenous people in global theories, and finally to understand how the difficulty of reproducing diagrams within a printed text dictated their use. 

Where? Burwood C7.06; Waurn Ponds ic2.108; VMP VMP ARTSED 2 36917

13 May

Presenter:  Brett Holman (guest)

Title:  History from below, looking up: aerial theatre, emotion and modernity

Abstract:  In the early 20th century, the aeroplane was the symbol of modernity par excellence. Technological change is an essential part of this sense of modernity, and few technological changes have been as dramatic or as unmistakable as the conquest of the air. For the first few decades of the twentieth century, flying was the object of intense popular fascination, and yet few people actually flew themselves, even as passengers, before the tremendous expansion of aviation during and after the Second World War. Even so, their experience of flight was often intensely exciting, since one of the most common ways to encounter flight was through seeing it, as an aviation spectacle in the form of aerial theatre such as air displays and air races. People flocked to aerodromes in their cumulative millions to watch aircraft in flight, performing aerobatics or fighting mock battles. This was a mass form of popular culture, which explicitly and implicitly made claims about the present and – even more so – future ability of technology to change the world, for better or for worse. In this talk I will sketch out an emotional history of aerial theatre, focusing on how it helped to construct popular ideas about modernity, primarily in Britain and Australia.
 
Where? Burwood C7.06; Waurn Ponds ic2.108; VMP VMP ARTSED 2 36917
 
 

20 May

Presenters: Fiona Gatt and Deborah Lee-Talbot

Title:

Abstract:

Where? Burwood C7.06; Waurn Ponds ic2.108; VMP VMP ARTSED 2 36917

Deborah Lee-Talbot’s presentation

Title:

Discourses of ‘Self-denial’ and ‘Self-improvement’ within the London Missionary Society and how they impacted women’s experiences of family life in New Guinea, 1873-1900.

Abstract:

During the late nineteenth century, the gendered performances of white European Christians were underpinned by the discursive ideal of ‘self-denial’.[1] In comparison, Pasifika Christians performed gendered roles guided by a Christian principle of ‘moral responsibility and accountability’. This paper offers a comparison between the experiences of motherhood and childrearing between European white women and Pasifika women in the London Missionary Society spaces of New Guinea, from 1873 to 1900. Using archival materials as the foundation of my discussion I explore how the relational aspect of femininities, the relations among types of Imperial and Pasifika femininities, were performed concerning notions of motherhood. I examine how women related to one another as mothers and their performances of childcare. I argue the European missionaries offered faulted representations of as the ‘father and mother’ of their own missions, as they sent their children to boarding institutions, where they became ‘orphans of missions’.[2]  This problematic approach led to Pasifika Christians adapting pre-existing kinship relations, based on crucial socio-cultural relationships of morality and reciprocity, to construct a new representation of the Christian family.

[1] Fjelde Tjelle, Missionary Masculinity, 1870-1930: The Norwegian Missionaries in South-Africa, 2.

[2] Fjelde Tjelle, 187.

27 May

Presenter: Dr Carolyn Holbrook

Title: Kyabram Reform Movement and Federation

Abstract: forthcoming

Where? Burwood C7.06; Waurn Ponds ic2.108; VMP VMP ARTSED 2 36917

Trimester 2

15 July

Presenter:

Title: 

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22 July

Presenter: Dr Gwyn McClelland

Title: forthcoming

Abstract: forthcoming

29 July

Presenter: Henry Reese

Title: forthcoming

Abstract: forthcoming

5 August

Presenter: Jacqui Barker

Title: forthcoming

Abstract: forthcoming

12 August

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19 August

Presenter: Roberta Bivins

Title: forthcoming

Abstract: forthcoming

26 August

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2 September 

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9 September 

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16 September 

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23 September 

Presenter: Dr Greg Burgess 

Title: 

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30 September- final seminar for 2020

Presenter:

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Past Seminars

Trimester 1

11 March

Presenter: Associate Professor Clare Corbould

Title:
 Histories of Slavery, Lost and Found, and the Ethical Imperative to Keep Recovering Women’s History

Abstract: How did knowledge about enslavement in the Americas move from internal to African American communities to take up a central (if still contested) place in academic research and teaching? In this paper I will recount the experiences of Ophelia Settle Egypt, the first trained social scientist to conduct interviews with men and women who had been enslaved. Settle Egypt pioneered the techniques that would form the basis of a massive New Deal project to interview some 4,000 ex-slaves. Settle Egypt also wrote articles, a book manuscript, memoir, and fiction about her experiences, and about United States slavery. These remarkable studies constitute nothing less than a social history of slavery and pre-date by decades the famed 1970s scholarship of men such as John Blassingame, George Rawick, and Lawrence Levine. Why has Settle Egypt been forgotten and why must she be remembered?

Biography: Clare Corbould is Associate Professor of History at Deakin University. She has published extensively in African American history and American Studies, including Becoming African Americans (Harvard UP, 2009) and articles and chapters published in venues including Radical History ReviewJournal of Social HistoryJournal of American StudiesTransition. This talk comes from a project funded by an ARC future fellowship and is part of a book about the legacy of the thousands of interviews conducted with formerly enslaved people between the late 1920s and 1940s.

Where? Burwood C7.06; Waurn Ponds ic2.108; VMP VMP ARTSED 2 36917

18 March

Presenter:  Sarah Ashbridge, University of Huddersfield

Title:  “The Weight of the Dead on the Living”: Identifying Fallen Soldiers 1914-18

Abstract:  This paper explores the development and introduction of British and Australian soldiers’ identity discs and their problematic use during the First World War.

With problems in the durability of discs and despite the introduction of the double identity disc in 1916, the number of unidentified bodies increased exponentially as the war progressed.  The inability to confirm the fate and location of so many men would reshape civilian cultures of grief and mourning, as national loss took priority over personal loss. The public needed answers. More specifically, the living needed answers. 

This paper will utilise archival reports, the letters of soldiers and items of material culture to explore the ‘weight of the dead on the living’ as a result of the failures of British identity discs used during the First World War. It will conclude with a number of archaeological case studies to demonstrate the difficulties with the identification of fallen soldiers in the field today, making recommendations for the improved recording of personal effects in order to assist future investigations to establish identity. 

Biography:  Sarah Ashbridge is a PhD student in the History Department at the University of Huddersfield, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Heritage Consortium. She is co-supervised in the School of Archaeological and Forensic Sciences at the University of Bradford, from which university she received her MSc Forensic Archaeology and Crime Scene Investigation. Utilising an interdisciplinary methodology, Sarah’s doctoral research takes an anthropological approach to the history of British identity discs, also used by Australian soldiers during the First World War, situating their development within the broader history of the use identifying marks for the purpose of identifying fallen soldiers. Sarah is visiting Australia to work with Dianne Rutherford at the Australian War Memorial, completing investigative work to confirm or disprove the presence of asbestos in British and Australian identity discs, making recommendations for the storage and handling of identity discs in museums and archives today.

Where? Burwood Mtg Room C7.06; Geelong ic2.108; VMP ARTSED 2 36917

25 March

Presenter: Tom Kehoe

Title:  “Women always drew the short straw”: The implications of crime by US solders in the post-World War I Rhineland, 1918-1923

Abstract:

Biography:  Thomas Kehoe is Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of New England. He has broad interests in US, European, and international history, with a particular focus on histories of crime and criminal justice. The result has been publications on diverse topics, from crime rates in colonial Australia to trials for witchcraft in the Roman Empire. Most of his work has been in modern German history, on which he has written articles on German-Arab relations, the treatment of Jehovah’s Witnesses by the Nazi military justice system, and the role of big tobacco in the post-war occupation. His interests are now primarily on occupation and post-conflict governance. Ohio University Press released his first book–The Art of Occupation: Crime and Governance in American-Controlled Germany, 1944-1949–in October 2019 and his edited collection on fear in the German-speaking world was released by Bloomsbury in February this year. His current research explores the development of US occupation strategies up to World War II and the methods of historical criminology.

Where? Burwood C7.06; Waurn Ponds ic2.108; VMP VMP ARTSED 2 36917