Deakin Anthropology Seminar Series #7: In and out of place – Ethnography as ‘journeying with’ between Central and South Australia

Anthropophiles, colleagues, friends, join us for the October instalment of our Deakin Anthropology Seminar Series 2018, presented by Deakin Anthropology’s own Dr Melinda Hinkson. The seminar will be followed by drinks at The Edge, 6/8 Eastern Beach Rd, Geelong.

 

Date: Thursday 4 October

Time: 4:00-5:30pm

Location: Deakin Waterfront AD1.122

(Also, by videoconference, at Deakin Burwood F2.009, Deakin Downtown, and VMP ARTSED SHSS 39354)

 

Abstract

In and out of place: ethnography as ‘journeying with’ between Central and South Australia

This paper explores the case of an Aboriginal woman from Central Australia who has in recent years experienced a radical shift in her life circumstances. It pursues a writerly approach that makes legible the variety of forces and relationships that she now navigates, including that of the anthropologist-friend. ‘Journeying with’ is proposed as an ethnographic method as well as an ethical stance well attuned to the turbulent circumstances of the present – in the Warlpiri life sketched here, and globally. Destabilisation and displacement are increasingly common features of contemporary experience, and this paper proposes that ethnography anchored at the level of the individual person is well placed to engage unsettling transformations in the world at large, in social relationships and modes of personhood, as well as in anthropological production.​

 

Biography

Melinda Hinkson is a social anthropologist with wide ranging interests in visual culture. Her current research explores intersections between modes of governance, cultures of seeing and creative practice in central Australia. The first stage of this project resulted in the book Remembering the Future: Warlpiri Life Through the Prism of Drawing (Aboriginal Studies Press 2014) and an associated exhibition for the National Museum of Australia. The next phase of the project explores the turbulence of displacement. Wider research interests include postcolonial placemaking, the politics of intercultural recognition and the conceptualisation of person-image relations in contemporary society.

Deakin Anthropology Seminar Series #6: Cow is a Mother, Mothers Can Do Anything for Their Children

Friends, colleagues, please join us for the August instalment of our Deakin Anthropology Seminar Series 2018, presented by Deakin’s own Dr Yamini Narayanan. The seminar will be followed by drinks at The Edge, 6/8 Eastern Beach Rd, Geelong.

 

Date: Thursday 2 August
Time: 4:00-5:30pm
Location: Deakin Waterfront AD1.122

(Also, by videoconference, at Deakin Burwood F2.009, Deakin Downtown, and VMP ARTSED SHSS 39354)

 

Cow is a Mother, Mothers Can Do Anything for Their Children: Gaushalas as Landscapes of Anthropatriarchy and Hindu Patriarchy

This paper argues that gaushalas, or cow shelters, in India are mobilised as sites of Hindutva or Hindu ultranationalism, where it is a ‘vulnerable’ Hindu Indian nation – or the ‘Hindu mother cow’ as Mother India – ­ who needs ‘sanctuary’ from predatory Muslim males.  Through empirical research, this paper demonstrates that gaushalas generally function as spaces of exploitation, incarceration, and gendered violence for the animals. The paper broadens posthumanist feminist theory to illustrate how bovine bodies, akin to women’s bodies, are mobilised as productive, reproductive, and symbolic capital to advance Hindu extremism and ultranationalism. It subjectifies animal bodies as landscapes of nation-(un)making using eco-feminism and its sub-field of vegan feminism.

 

Biography

Dr. Yamini Narayanan is Senior Lecturer in International and Community Development. Her work is focussed on two major themes: the nexus between animals and urban planning in India; and the intersections of speciesism, casteism and racism in the ways in which animals are enrolled in nation-building projects. Her forthcoming book will offer one of the first empirical critiques of India’s cow protectionism discourse and politics from a critical animal studies standpoint, examining bovine realities in both sites of production and protection.

Deakin Anthropology Seminar Series #5: Mobility under constraint: Precarity, temporality, and colonial legacies in the Shepparton food bowl

Friends, colleagues, please join us for the July instalment of our Deakin Anthropology Seminar Series 2018, presented by Dr Victoria Stead, of the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation. The seminar will be followed by drinks at The Edge, 6/8 Eastern Beach Rd, Geelong.

 

Date: Thursday 5 July
Time: 4:00-5:30pm
Location: Deakin Waterfront AD1.122

(Also, by videoconference, at Deakin Burwood F2.009, Deakin Downtown, and VMP ARTSED SHSS 39354)

 

Mobility under constraint: Precarity, temporality, and colonial legacies in the Shepparton food bowl
 
Labour in the Australian horticultural industry is being reconfigured in the midst of a complex of social, environmental and economic transformations. This paper examines the experiences a group of ni-Vanuatu workers who arrived in the Greater Shepparton Region as part of a specific visa program that brings Pacific Islanders to work to work in designated jobs—particularly, harvest labour—for which there is deemed to be an insufficient local labour supply. The temporary migrations of these workers, the highly mediated labour relations they are embroiled in, and the conditions of the industry within which they are employed, resonate with key aspects of the neoliberal transformations captured by the burgeoning literature on precarity. Precarity reduces the ‘lifelong scope’ of the worker to a series of exploitable, present moments, and to this extent also acts upon the future (Tsianos and Papadopoulos 2006). In this vein, the ni-Vanuatu workers are thrust into relations and rhythms of labour that both promise, and work to subvert, their flourishing. But their experiences also encourage a reconsideration of the presentism that is often ascribed to precarity. Precarity may, indeed, describe a particular moment of contemporary capitalism, but in the packing sheds and tomato farms of the north-central Victoria, it also has a genealogy that connects the migrations of 21st century ni-Vanuatu with those of their 19th century kin ‘blackbirded’ to the sugar fields of Queensland and northern New South Wales. The labour relations and experiences of contemporary ni-Vanuatu are thus not only precarious but also starkly, and hierarchically, racialized. Here, the denial of full humanity under contemporary regimes of flexible accumulation – the ‘cruel optimism’ (Berlant 2011) of precarity – echoes the civilising projects & developmentalism that have long been the marker of Australian coloniality in the Pacific.

 

Biography

Victoria Stead is a DECRA Research Fellow at the Alfred Deakin Institute, Deakin University. She is an anthropologist with a focus on the Pacific, particularly Melanesia, and also regional Australia. Her research explores local negotiations of postcolonial legacies, and processes of change related to land, labour, memory, and belonging. Victoria is the author of Becoming Landowners: Entanglements of Custom and Modernity in Papua New Guinea and Timor-Leste (University of Hawai’i Press, 2017), and a co-author of Sustainable Communities, Sustainable Livelihoods: Other Paths for Papua New Guinea (University of Hawai’i Press, 2012).

Deakin Anthropology Seminar Series #4: Dr Jessica Walton, ‘Distant friendship: Playful connections among Australian and Korean students in global on-line collaborative learning exchanges’

Friends, colleagues, please join us for the June instalment of our Deakin Anthropology Seminar Series 2018, presented by Dr Jessica Walton, of Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation. The seminar will be followed by drinks at The Edge, 6/8 Eastern Beach Rd, Geelong.

 

Date: Thursday 7 June
Time: 4:00-5:30pm
Location: Deakin Waterfront AD1.122

(Also, by videoconference, at Deakin Burwood F2.009, Deakin Downtown, and VMP ARTSED SHSS 39354)

 

Distant friendship: Playful connections among Australian and Korean students in global on-line collaborative learning exchanges

 

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into Australian and South Korean students’ experiences and perspectives of their participation in a global on-line collaborative learning exchange by drawing on theories of play and friendship. This paper is based on fieldwork conducted from 2016-2017 in South Korea and Australia at two primary schools and includes in-depth interviews with Grade 5 and Grade 6 students. Key research questions which this paper engages with are: How does an ethnographic understanding of friendship and playful modes of engagement provide a deeper understanding of interactions with distant peers in spaces of ‘intercultural learning’? In what ways might an understanding of children’s experiences of friendship and play rather than a limited focus on cross-cultural knowledge acquisition open up possibilities for the consideration of more open and less staid connections with culturally different peers?

 

Biography: Jessica Walton is a Senior Research Fellow at the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation at Deakin University (Melbourne, Australia). Her research is inter-disciplinary in scope with particular interests in the anthropology/sociology of education, race and ethnic relations, and migration. Recent publications include book chapters titled, “‘I am Korean’: Contested belonging in a ‘multicultural’ Korea” (In C. Halse, Ed. Interrogating belonging for young people in schools, Palgrave Macmillan) and “Beyond ‘getting along’: Understanding embodied whiteness in educational spaces” (In G. Vass, J. Maxwell, S. Rudolph & K. Gulson, Eds., The relationality of race and racism in education, Routledge). Jessica is an Associate Editor (Culture, Power and Education) for the Journal of Intercultural Studies and convenor of the Oceania Ethnography & Education Network (https://oeenetwork.wordpress.com).

Deakin Anthropology Seminar Series #3: Dr Rosita Henry, ‘Reflections on Representation: Writing Maggie’s Memoir’

Friends, colleagues, please join us for the May instalment of our Deakin Anthropology Seminar Series 2018, presented by Dr Rosita Henry, of James Cook University. The seminar will be followed by drinks at The Edge, 6/8 Eastern Beach Rd, Geelong.

 

Date: Thursday 3 May
Time: 4:00-5:30pm
Location: Deakin Waterfront AD1.122

(Also, by videoconference, at Deakin Burwood F2.009, Deakin Downtown, and VMP ARTSED SHSS 39354)

 

Reflections on Representation: Writing Maggie’s Memoir

 

Maggie’s Memoir is the story of a woman, whose mother was from the Western Highlands of Papua New Guinea and whose biological father was the older brother of Mick and Dan Leahy, the first Australian explorers to venture into the Highlands.  Maggie’s life spanned the early years of the Australian administration in Papua New Guinea and the heady possibilities of the first three decades after Independence.  She spent her late teenage years at a Catholic boarding school in the far north of Australia where she met her friend and biographer, Rosita Henry. Maggie’s Memoir is autobiographical, biographical and ethnographical. The book portrays a complex entanglement of social worlds – a narrative involving an interplay of many life stories, not just Maggie’s, but those of numerous other people whose lives she touched. In this seminar, Rosita Henry reflects upon the complications of narration and representation that writing such an ‘ethnographic auto/biography’ raises.

Deakin Anthropology Seminar Series #2: Dr Andrew Dawson, ‘The Senses in Post-War Driving’

Friends, colleagues, please join us for the April instalment of our Deakin Anthropology Seminar Series 2018, presented by Dr Andrew Dawson (Anthropology, University Melbourne). The seminar will be followed by drinks at The Edge, 6/8 Eastern Beach Rd, Geelong.

 

Date: Thursday 5 April
Time: 4:00-5:30pm
Location: Deakin Waterfront AD1.122

(Also, by videoconference, at Deakin Burwood F2.009, Deakin Downtown, and VMP ARTSED SHSS 39354)

 

The senses in post-war driving

 

Through a passenger-seat ethnography conducted in Bosnia and Herzegovina I explore the role of the senses in driving in ameliorating various forms of post-war unease. This is juxtaposed critically with an examination of pervasive representations of sensory disengagement in driving in contemporary automobilities research. I explain this as an outcome of the indebtedness of such research to a post WWII tradition of Marxian scholarship in which Fordism, the car and driving were presented as the key exemplars of Capitalist modernity and its evils.

 

The 2nd Oceania Ethnography and Education Conference: Call for Proposals

The 2nd Oceania Ethnography and Education Conference

16-17 August 2018, Deakin University, Deakin Downtown (727 Collins St, Level 12, Tower 2, Docklands, Melbourne)

Conference convenors: Dr Jessica Walton (Deakin University), Prof Julian Sefton-Green (Deakin University) and A/Prof Martin Forsey (University of Western Australia)

The Call for Papers is now open for the Oceania Ethnography & Education Network Conference. Abstracts and a short bio are due by 1 May 2018 to oeenetwork@gmail.com We are pleased to welcome invited speakers for two roundtable discussions including: Prof Jessica Zacher Pandya (California State University at Long Beach), Prof Missy Morton (University of Auckland), Ms Fetaui Iosefo (University of Auckland), Prof Hyang-jin Jung (Seoul National University), and A/Prof Megan Watkins (Western Sydney University). Please see the CFP below for more details.

After a successful inaugural conference in 2017, the aim of this conference is to continue to build and strengthen the Oceania Ethnography and Education Network (OEEN) by bringing together scholars from diverse disciplines who are interested in a socio-cultural analysis of education and the specific affordances of ethnographic research in educational settings. We hope this conference will provide increased awareness of each other’s research and contribute to developing future collaborations across the network. The conference will be hosted by the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship (ADI) and Globalisation and the Research for Educational Impact (REDI) at Deakin University and is supported by funding from the Australian Research Council, Deakin University and REDI.

Please consider joining the OEEN at: https://oeenetwork.wordpress.com/ or by sending an e-mail to oeenetwork@gmail.com

Call for Papers: In this conference, we seek to showcase a multi-disciplinary array of ethnographic engagements in and with educational settings from scholars, including postgraduate students, early career researchers and more established researchers, particularly among those based in “the Antipodes” (Oceania broadly speaking) or who were at some point in their career. The papers can range from short ‘show and tell’ type presentations to works in progress to presentations based on more developed research. We are searching for a diverse range of contributions that will help illustrate the variety of problems, passions, issues, concerns and interests surrounding educational matters. Historical foci are as welcome as papers concerned with matters contemporaneous. We are seeking papers that address a broad set of issues and focus on a range of research sites which speak to and advance knowledge of the following themes:

  • Methodological approaches to conducting ethnography in educational contexts.
  • Theoretical approaches that engage and advance theories within education.
  • Ethnographic engagement in educational settings (broadly defined).

We will also have two roundtable discussions with invited national and international speakers. Confirmed speakers for the following roundtables include:

Roundtable 1: Finding your place: The ethnographer in education

  • Prof Jessica Zacher Pandya (California State University at Long Beach)
  • Prof Missy Morton (University of Auckland)
  • Ms Fetaui Iosefo, PhD Candidate (University of Auckland)

Roundtable 2: Bodies and emotion in education

  • Prof Hyang-Jin Jung (Seoul National University).
  • A/Prof Megan Watkins (Western Sydney University)

Stay tuned for more details on the conference website:

http://www.deakin.edu.au/about-deakin/events/the-2nd-oceania-ethnography-and-education- conference

To participate, please submit abstracts of no more than 400 words as well as a 100-word bio to oeenetwork@gmail.com by 1 May 2018.

Full draft papers will be required by 9 August 2017. The selected papers will be pre-distributed to conference attendees only in order to facilitate a more engaging in-depth discussion at the conference and to support presenters to develop their papers. Presenters will have approximately 10 minutes to speak to their papers to leave plenty of time for discussion.

University of Melbourne Seminar, March 2: Dr Jane Dyson, “Fresh Contact: Youth, Ghosts, and Atmosphere in India”

Friends of Deakin Anthropology, you may be interested in this event convened by our colleagues at the University of Melbourne Anthropology Seminar Series:

FRESH CONTACT: YOUTH, GHOSTS AND ATMOSPHERE IN INDIA

Friday, 2 March, 3:30 – 5:00pm John Medley Building Linkway (level 4)

Dr Jane Dyson, University of Melbourne

I use long-term research in an Indian village to examine how a generation of young men re-evaluate their local environment following a period of migration. I develop Karl Mannheim’s notion of ‘fresh contact’ to argue that young men aged between 25 and 34 who have lived outside their home re-appraise their village economically, physically and spiritually when they return home, with particular emphasis on how young people re- engage with ghosts and the problem of spirit possession. I highlight the spatial nature of ‘fresh contact’, drawing attention especially to young men’s focus on developing a good ‘mahaul’ – a Hindi word meaning ‘atmosphere’. I also examine how earlier experiences inform the actions of a relatively ‘old’ set of youth aged 25-34, highlighting the temporal nature of fresh contact. My research highlights the value of examining young people’s histories and undertaking long-term ethnographic research.

Biography

Dr Jane Dyson is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Geography, University of Melbourne. She has worked for 15 years in the Indian Himalayas, examining issues around gender, work and social transformation with a focus on children and young people. Her research has been published in a book, Working Childhoods: Youth, Agency and the Environment in India (Cambridge University Press, 2015), and in journals including American Ethnologist, Economy and Society, and JRAI.

To get notices for events related to Anthropology at the University of Melbourne:

https://lists.unimelb.edu.au/info/friendsofanthropology

Deakin Anthropology Seminar Series #1: Rohan Bastin, ‘An Obscure Desire for Catastrophe: The Moral Anthropology Turn’

Friends, colleagues, please join us for the very first instalment of our Deakin Anthropology Seminar Series 2018, presented by our very own Dr Rohan Bastin (Division of Anthropology, Deakin University). The seminar will be followed by drinks at The Edge, 6/8 Eastern Beach Rd, Geelong.

 

Date: Thursday 1 March
Time: 4:00-5:30pm
Location: Deakin Waterfront AD1.122

(Also, by videoconference, at Deakin Burwood F2.009, Deakin Downtown, and VMP ARTSED SHSS 39354)

 

An Obscure Desire for Catastrophe: The Moral Anthropology Turn

 

This paper addresses the relation between the so-called rise of moral anthropology and neoliberal economy broadly defined as an economic ideology where the free market is ostensibly circumscribed by apparatuses of self-surveillance and control. It does so by addressing an essay by Badiou on economy and morality, Lazzarato on indebtedness and morality, and also Nietzsche’s concepts of slave morality and ressentiment. Bouncing off a remark by Fassin on what he sees as the humanist turn in anthropology, which he argues is a profound evolution in the discipline, the paper argues that moral anthropology of this kind is largely novel in its self-representation and with that its awareness of its situation and its past. By tying these developments to the moralism of debt and the thoroughgoing economism of much recent scholarship, the paper also raises questions about other contemporary concepts including the Anthropocene, the assemblage and the ‘post-human’. It asks whether the spread of economy and the morality of necessity are unavoidable elements for contemporary anthropology or essential badges of participation and survival, elements of the brand, in the contemporary academy and its debt/control society.

 

Biography

Rohan Bastin is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Deakin University. He leads a project that proposes comparative research on socio-religious reform movements in Sri Lanka, exploring four separate yet related research foci in the post-war context involving each of the major world religions (Buddhism, Hinduism, Christianity and Islam). It explores questions of human equality and social cohesion in the setting of post-conflict national reconstruction.

Deakin Anthropology Seminar Series #9: Cameo Dalley, ‘Encounters in the Death Space: Cattle, Aboriginal Capitalism and Organisations in Remote Northern Australia’

Friends, colleagues, please join us for the November instalment of our Deakin Anthropology Seminar Series 2017, presented by Dr Cameo Dalley of Melbourne. The seminar will be followed by drinks at The Edge, 6/8 Eastern Beach Rd, Geelong.

Date: Thursday 9 November
Time: 4:00-5:30pm
Location: Deakin Waterfront AD1.122

(Also, by videoconference, at Deakin Burwood C2.05, Deakin Downtown, and VMP 39384)

Encounters in the Death Space: Cattle, Aboriginal Capitalism and Organisations in Remote Northern Australia

This article draws on research undertaken in a remote Aboriginal pastoral station in the Kimberley region of northwest Australia to explore the encounters and after-effects of the arrival of a new form of expansive Aboriginal capitalism. The gloss of the neoliberal capitalist ideal is the empowerment of a small group of emplaced but hypermarginal Aboriginal people, through the provision of capacity and resources by a more powerful Aboriginal organisation. However, the promise of empowerment hides the predatory nature of the encounter and the lateral structural violence that it entails. This violence is propelled by what Amit (2012) has called ‘exceptional disjunctures’, which here I take to be moments that punctuate the social fabric of pre-existing forms of indigeneity. Here the ‘death space’, to borrow Taussig’s (1987) notion, is not occupied by the colonial settler-state, but rather by Aboriginal people and Aboriginal organisations themselves. The impacts of encounters in this space are compound in that they involve the wresting of land, and the control of commodities (cattle) away from a small group of people who have had their tradition-derived rights recognised by the settler-state through successive legal processes. What is at risk in these encounters then is the expansion of hypermarginality via the diminishment of claims to particularised forms of indigenous identity.

 

Biography

Dr Cameo Dalley is a McArthur Postdoctoral Fellow in anthropology at the University of Melbourne. Her current research project has investigated the multiple realms in which kardiya and Ngarinyin Aboriginal belonging is manifest in the Kimberley region. She has published on topics of identity, indigeneity and the intercultural and her most recent publication examines education-driven mobility for Indigenous youth http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/p-9830-9780824867966.aspx.